Article

Differential regulation of epidermal function by VDR coactivators.

Endocrine Research Unit, Department of Medicine, Veterans Affairs Medical Center, San Francisco, CA 94121, USA.
The Journal of steroid biochemistry and molecular biology (Impact Factor: 3.98). 03/2010; 121(1-2):308-13. DOI: 10.1016/j.jsbmb.2010.03.027
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT The transcriptional activity of the vitamin D receptor (VDR) is regulated by a number of coactivator and corepressor complexes, which bind to the VDR in a ligand (1,25(OH)2D3) dependent (coactivators) or inhibited (corepressors) process. In the keratinocyte the major coactivator complexes include the vitamin D interacting protein (DRIP) complex and the steroid receptor coactivator (SRC) complexes. These coactivator complexes are not interchangeable in their regulation of keratinocyte proliferation and differentiation. We found that the DRIP complex is the main complex binding to VDR in the proliferating keratinocyte, whereas SRC2 and 3 and their associated proteins are the major coactivators binding to VDR in the differentiated keratinocyte. Moreover, we have found a specific role for DRIP205 in the regulation of beta-catenin pathways regulating keratinocyte proliferation, whereas SRC3 uniquely regulates the ability of 1,25(OH)2D3 to induce more differentiated functions such as lipid synthesis and processing required for permeability barrier formation and the innate immune response triggered by disruption of the barrier. These findings provide a basis by which we can understand how one receptor (VDR) and one ligand (1,25(OH)2D3) can regulate a large number of genes in a sequential and differentiation specific fashion.

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May 31, 2014