Article

The role of dual-degree programs in colleges and schools of pharmacy: the report of the 2008-09 Research and Graduate Affairs Committee.

University of Texas at Austin, TX, USA.
American journal of pharmaceutical education (Impact Factor: 1.19). 12/2009; 73 Suppl:S6. DOI: 10.5688/aj7308S06
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    • "Many physicians, nurses and other clinicians see the MBA as the most desirable management degree. The rapid growth of PharmD/MBA programs in the United States is evidence of this new market (Crismon et al., 2009). "
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    ABSTRACT: USA with an emphasis on the comparison of business schools and health science settings. It seeks to explain why different organizational cultures exist and how this affects education. Design/methodology/approach – The approach relies on literature review and descriptive analysis using secondary data. Institutional economics helps provide perspective on different academic cultures and orientations. Findings – Healthcare management education originated in the early twentieth century. Business schools at the University of Chicago and Northwestern were early pioneers. By mid-century, schools of public health and medicine entered and came to dominate with strong graduate programs at Berkeley, Michigan and other leading universities. More recently, business schools have differentiated away from the generic MBA and expanded into this market. Advocates of health science settings commonly see healthcare as different from other forms of management. The externally funded model of medical education relying on patient and grant revenues dominates the health sciences. This can lead to preference for faculty who generate funds and a neglect of core academic areas that historically have not relied on grants and contracts. Practical implications – This history of health management education provides insight for students, researchers, educators and administrators. It underscores comparative advantage of different academic settings. Originality/value – This paper serves to fill a gap in the management literature. It provides history and perspective about academic settings not readily available.
    Journal of Management History 10/2012; 18(4):386-401.
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    • "Many physicians, nurses and other clinicians see the MBA as the most desirable management degree. The rapid growth of PharmD/MBA programs in the United States is evidence of this new market (Crismon et al., 2009). "
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Purpose ‐ This paper aims to provide a history of graduate healthcare management education in the USA with an emphasis on the comparison of business schools and health science settings. It seeks to explain why different organizational cultures exist and how this affects education. Design/methodology/approach ‐ The approach relies on literature review and descriptive analysis using secondary data. Institutional economics helps provide perspective on different academic cultures and orientations. Findings ‐ Healthcare management education originated in the early twentieth century. Business schools at the University of Chicago and Northwestern were early pioneers. By mid-century, schools of public health and medicine entered and came to dominate with strong graduate programs at Berkeley, Michigan and other leading universities. More recently, business schools have differentiated away from the generic MBA and expanded into this market. Advocates of health science settings commonly see healthcare as different from other forms of management. The externally funded model of medical education relying on patient and grant revenues dominates the health sciences. This can lead to preference for faculty who generate funds and a neglect of core academic areas that historically have not relied on grants and contracts. Practical implications ‐ This history of health management education provides insight for students, researchers, educators and administrators. It underscores comparative advantage of different academic settings. Originality/value ‐ This paper serves to fill a gap in the management literature. It provides history and perspective about academic settings not readily available.
    09/2012; 18(4). DOI:10.1108/17511341211258738
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    ABSTRACT: The demand for public health services is being outpaced by a shrinking public health workforce. This creates a unique opportunity for pharmacists to become more engaged in public health activities, particularly in rural underserved areas. To meet the need for additional public health professionals, we designed a master of public health (MPH) program in a rural state under the leadership of a department of pharmacy practice. In addition to a core set of courses, the MPH program has public health specialty tracks (disease state management, emergency management, health promotion practice, infectious disease management, food safety, gerontology, and medical management and administration) that could be completed as a certificate program or used towards an MPH degree. The program allows students to complete the graduate degree with a minimum of prerequisite coursework. The MPH degree provides an opportunity for pharmacists and other health care professionals to gain an understanding of the interprofessional approach to solving public health problems and will enhance their role in public health and within their health care team.
    American journal of pharmaceutical education 12/2010; 74(10):186. DOI:10.5688/aj7410186 · 1.19 Impact Factor
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