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    ABSTRACT: Previous research has suggested that vitamin D and sunlight are related to cardiovascular outcomes, but associations between sunlight and risk factors have not been investigated. We examined whether increased sunlight exposure was related to improved cardiovascular risk factor status.
    BMC Neurology 06/2014; 14(1):133. · 2.49 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The incidence of hypertension and cardiovascular disease correlates with latitude and rises in winter. The molecular basis for this remains obscure. As nitric oxide (NO) metabolites are abundant in human skin we hypothesised that exposure to UVA may mobilise NO bioactivity into the circulation to exert beneficial cardiovascular effects independently of vitamin D. In 24 healthy volunteers irradiation of the skin with 2 Standard Erythemal Doses of UVA lowered BP, with concomitant decreases in circulating nitrate and rises in nitrite concentrations. Unexpectedly, acute dietary intervention aimed at modulating systemic nitrate availability had no effect on UV-induced hemodynamic changes, indicating that cardiovascular effects were not mediated via direct utilization of circulating nitrate. UVA irradiation of the forearm caused increased blood flow independently of NO-synthase activity, suggesting involvement of pre-formed cutaneous NO stores. Confocal fluorescence microscopy studies of human skin pre-labelled with the NO-imaging probe DAF2-DA revealed that UVA-induced NO release occurs in a NOS-independent, dose-dependent fashion, with the majority of the light-sensitive NO pool in the upper epidermis. Collectively, our data provide mechanistic insights into an important function of the skin in modulating systemic NO bioavailability which may account for the latitudinal and seasonal variations of BP and cardiovascular disease.Journal of Investigative Dermatology accepted article preview online, 20 January 2014. doi:10.1038/jid.2014.27.
    Journal of Investigative Dermatology 01/2014; · 6.19 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Time and environmental physical activity are involved in timing of many medical events. In a recent study published by the National Acad-emy of Science, USA it was shown that month of birth is related to longevity. The aim of this study was to check the month of birth distribu-tion in a great group of AMI patients of both gender, one of the great killers in the developed countries, to check the mentioned paradigm of month of birth and longevity. Methods & Pa-tients: Patients admitted to Cardiology Depart-ments of a tertiary University Hospital in Kaunas, Lithuania with AMI at years 1990-2010 (n-22047) were studied. Month of birth of these patients, total and both gender were checked. Monthly, quarterly and trimester comparison were done. Statistical differences established using t-Stu-dent test and distribution by percents of the yearly months of birth. Results: It was a sig-nificant difference in the month of birth of the studied AMI population. January and first quar-ter and trimester born patients were more often in the studied AMI patients group. The higher morbidity by Cardiovascular diseases can be a significant ingredient in the structure of popula-tion longevity. Possible mechanisms explaining our findings are discussed. Conclusion: In the AMI population people born in January, first quarter or trimester of the year are dominating in both gender groups. The results of this study can be an additional confirmation of the para-digm about links between month of birth and longevity.

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May 22, 2014