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    ABSTRACT: Previous research has suggested that vitamin D and sunlight are related to cardiovascular outcomes, but associations between sunlight and risk factors have not been investigated. We examined whether increased sunlight exposure was related to improved cardiovascular risk factor status.
    BMC Neurology 06/2014; 14(1):133. DOI:10.1186/1471-2377-14-133 · 2.49 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: There is mounting concern for the health of urban populations as cities expand at an unprecedented rate. Urban green spaces provide settings for a remarkable range of physical and mental health benefits, and pioneering health policy is recognizing nature as a cost-effective tool for planning healthy cities. Despite this, limited information on how specific elements of nature deliver health outcomes restricts its use for enhancing population health. We articulate a framework for identifying direct and indirect causal pathways through which nature delivers health benefits, and highlight current evidence. We see a need for a bold new research agenda founded on testing causality that transcends disciplinary boundaries between ecology and health. This will lead to cost-effective and tailored solutions that could enhance population health and reduce health inequalities. (Am J Public Health. Published online ahead of print January 20, 2015: e1-e8. doi:10.2105/AJPH.2014.302324).
    American Journal of Public Health 01/2015; 105(3):e1-e8. DOI:10.2105/AJPH.2014.302324 · 4.23 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Time and environmental physical activity are involved in timing of many medical events. In a recent study published by the National Acad-emy of Science, USA it was shown that month of birth is related to longevity. The aim of this study was to check the month of birth distribu-tion in a great group of AMI patients of both gender, one of the great killers in the developed countries, to check the mentioned paradigm of month of birth and longevity. Methods & Pa-tients: Patients admitted to Cardiology Depart-ments of a tertiary University Hospital in Kaunas, Lithuania with AMI at years 1990-2010 (n-22047) were studied. Month of birth of these patients, total and both gender were checked. Monthly, quarterly and trimester comparison were done. Statistical differences established using t-Stu-dent test and distribution by percents of the yearly months of birth. Results: It was a sig-nificant difference in the month of birth of the studied AMI population. January and first quar-ter and trimester born patients were more often in the studied AMI patients group. The higher morbidity by Cardiovascular diseases can be a significant ingredient in the structure of popula-tion longevity. Possible mechanisms explaining our findings are discussed. Conclusion: In the AMI population people born in January, first quarter or trimester of the year are dominating in both gender groups. The results of this study can be an additional confirmation of the para-digm about links between month of birth and longevity.

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May 22, 2014