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Available from: Richard Beresford Weller, Aug 05, 2015
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    ABSTRACT: Obesity and hypertension are increasing problems worldwide, resulting in an enormous economic burden to the society. The metabolic syndrome components (ie, central obesity, dyslipidemia, hyperglycemia, and hypertension) are used to identify individuals at high risk of developing cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. The cause of the syndrome is not yet clear, but insulin resistance and dyslipidemia have been proposed. Emerging evidence suggest that increased visceral adipose tissue stimulates secretion of bioactive compounds that promote inflammation, oxidative stress, and impair lipid metabolism and vascular relaxation. Interestingly, all components of the metabolic syndrome display seasonal variation, and hence may influence diagnosis. The seasonal variability in metabolic components is partly explained by changes in climate and lifestyle factors (eg, physical activity and diet). The clinical role for seasonal variations in metabolic risk factors remains to be further elucidated. However, the new findings indicate that seasonal variation should be considered in diagnosis and management decisions. KeywordsAdipokine–Adipose tissue–Age–ATP III, cardiovascular disease–Cholesterol–DASH–Diabetes–Diet–Dyslipidemia–Gender–Gene polymorphism–Hypertension–High-density lipoprotein–IDF–Insulin resistance–Low-density lipoprotein–NCEP–Nitrate–Nitric oxide–Obesity–Oxidative stress–Vitamin D
    Current Cardiovascular Risk Reports 01/2011; 5(1):29-37. DOI:10.1007/s12170-010-0139-z
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    ABSTRACT: Time and environmental physical activity are involved in timing of many medical events. In a recent study published by the National Acad-emy of Science, USA it was shown that month of birth is related to longevity. The aim of this study was to check the month of birth distribu-tion in a great group of AMI patients of both gender, one of the great killers in the developed countries, to check the mentioned paradigm of month of birth and longevity. Methods & Pa-tients: Patients admitted to Cardiology Depart-ments of a tertiary University Hospital in Kaunas, Lithuania with AMI at years 1990-2010 (n-22047) were studied. Month of birth of these patients, total and both gender were checked. Monthly, quarterly and trimester comparison were done. Statistical differences established using t-Stu-dent test and distribution by percents of the yearly months of birth. Results: It was a sig-nificant difference in the month of birth of the studied AMI population. January and first quar-ter and trimester born patients were more often in the studied AMI patients group. The higher morbidity by Cardiovascular diseases can be a significant ingredient in the structure of popula-tion longevity. Possible mechanisms explaining our findings are discussed. Conclusion: In the AMI population people born in January, first quarter or trimester of the year are dominating in both gender groups. The results of this study can be an additional confirmation of the para-digm about links between month of birth and longevity.
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    ABSTRACT: Inorganic nitrate from dietary and endogenous sources is emerging as a substrate for in vivo generation of nitric oxide (NO) and other reactive nitrogen oxides. Dietary amounts of nitrate clearly have robust NO-like effects in humans, including blood pressure reduction, inhibition of platelet aggregation, and vasoprotective activity. In animal models, nitrate protects against ischaemia-reperfusion injuries and several other types of cardiovascular disorders. In addition, nitrate most surprisingly decreases whole body oxygen cost during exercise with preserved or even enhanced maximal performance. Oxidative stress and reduced NO bioavailability are critically linked to development of hypertension and other forms of cardiovascular diseases. Mechanistically, a central target for the effects of nitrate and its reaction products seems to be the mitochondrion and modulation of oxidative stress. All in vivo effects of nitrate are achievable with amounts corresponding to a rich intake of vegetables, which are particularly rich in this anion. A theory is now emerging suggesting nitrate as an active component in vegetables contributing to the beneficial health effects of this food group, including protection against cardiovascular disease and type-2 diabetes.
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