Article

[Diagnosis of tuberculosis in paediatrics].

Hospital Materno-Infantil Carlos Haya, Universidad de Málaga, España.
Anales de Pediatría (Impact Factor: 0.87). 03/2010; 72(4):283.e1-283.e14. DOI: 10.1016/j.anpedi.2010.01.002
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Tuberculosis is one of the most important health problems worldwide. There are an increasing number of cases, including children, due to different reasons in developed countries. The most likely determining cause is immigration from highly endemic areas. Measures to optimise early and appropriate diagnosis of the different forms of tuberculosis in children are a real priority. Two Societies of the Spanish Paediatric Association (Spanish Society of Paediatric Infectology and Spanish Society of Paediatric Pneumology) have agreed this Consensus Document in order to homogenise diagnostic criteria in paediatric patients.

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