Article

Propionibacteria used as probiotics - A review

http://dx.doi.org/10.1051/lait:19954-534 01/1995; DOI: 10.1051/lait:19954-534

ABSTRACT The investigation of probiotics has been very intensive during the last decades, con-centrating mainly on lactic acid and bifidobacteria. But there is also clear evidence that propionibacteria have probiotic effects. The probiotic influence is based on the production of propionic acid, bacteriocins, vitamin B12, better exploitation of fodder, growth stimulation of other beneficial bacteria and the ability to stay alive during gastric digestion. In Finland, large test series with piglets receiving Propionibacterium freudenreichii in their fodder have been performed. The growth promotant effect was significant and the fodder demand was clearly lower when compared with the control group. The bacterial concentration used was, on average, 2x109 cfu / g and the dose / animal 1-5 g / d. The mineral and trace element contents of a Propionibacterium freudenreichii-mass have also been studied. In other European countries, mixtures of propionibacteria and lactic acid / bifidobacteria have been used with positive results as probiotics for calves, Propionibacteria have also been investigated as human probiotics, especially in curing intestinal disorders of children and elderly people. The occurrence of lactic acid bacteria and propionibacteria in living food is very interesting as different kinds of this food type obviously act as probiotics. Thus, propionibacteria can be considered as potential probiotics requiring further research. Durant les dernières décennies, la recherche de probiotiques a été très intense, principalement sur les bactéries lactiques et les bifidobactéries. Mais il est également évident que les bactéries propioniques ont des effets probiotiques. Leur activité probiotique est basée sur la production d'acide propionique, de bactériocines, de vitamine B12, la meilleure utilisation des fourrages, la stimulation de la croissance des autres bactéries bénéfiques et la capacité à survivre au cours de la digestion gastrique. En Finlande, un test à grande échelle a été effectué sur des porcelets auxquels on incorporait Propionibacterium freudenreichii à la nourriture. L'effet sur la promotion de la croissance était significatif et la demande de fourrage était nettement plus basse comparée au groupe contrôle. La concentration bactérienne utilisée était en moyenne de 2 x 109 ufc / g et la dose par animal de 1-5 g / jour. Les teneurs en minéraux et oligoéléments d'une biomasse de Propionibacterium freudenreichii ont également été étudiées. Dans d'autres pays européens, des mélanges de bactéries propioniques et lactiques / bifidobactéries ont été utilisés comme probiotiques pour les veaux, avec des résultats positifs. Les bactéries propioniques ont aussi été utilisées et examinées comme probiotiques chez l'homme, spécialement pour soigner les désordres intestinaux des enfants et des personnes âgées. La présence de bactéries lactiques et de bactéries propioniques dans les aliments vivants est très intéressante puisque plusieurs sortes d'aliments de ce type agissent manifestement comme probiotiques. Les bactéries propioniques peuvent donc être considérées comme des probiotiques potentiels nécessitant de plus amples recherches.

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