Article

Commentary on the United Kingdom evidence report about the effectiveness of manual therapies.

Department of Neurology, University of California, Irvine, CA, USA.
Chiropractic & Osteopathy 02/2010; 18(1):4. DOI: 10.1186/1746-1340-18-4
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT This is an accompanying commentary on the article by Gert Bronfort and colleagues about the effectiveness of manual therapy. The two commentaries were provided independently and combined into this single article by the journal editors.

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