Commentary on the United Kingdom evidence report about the effectiveness of manual therapies

Department of Neurology, University of California, Irvine, CA, USA.
Chiropractic & Osteopathy 02/2010; 18(1):4. DOI: 10.1186/1746-1340-18-4
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT This is an accompanying commentary on the article by Gert Bronfort and colleagues about the effectiveness of manual therapy. The two commentaries were provided independently and combined into this single article by the journal editors.

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Available from: Scott Haldeman, Sep 28, 2015
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    • "In a recent commentary, Scott Haldeman [42] highlighted the need to base therapy on evidence: "It does not serve patients to provide treatment that has been shown to be ineffective or where there is insufficient evidence to reach a conclusion when there are other options available that have been demonstrated to be beneficial." and "It is not acceptable today to claim that a treatment is effective in helping patients when there is no evidence to support these claims." "
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