Article

Estimated HIV incidence, prevalence, and mortality rates among racial/ethnic populations of men who have sex with men, Florida.

Florida Department of Health, Bureau of HIV/AIDS, Tallahassee, FL 32399-1715, USA.
JAIDS Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes (Impact Factor: 4.65). 02/2010; 54(4):398-405. DOI: 10.1097/QAI.0b013e3181d0c165
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Population-based HIV incidence, prevalence, and mortality rates among men who have sex with men (MSM) have been unavailable, limiting assessment of racial/ethnic disparities and epidemic dynamics.
Using estimated numbers of MSM aged >or=18 years by race/ethnicity as denominators, from models in our prior work, we estimated MSM HIV prevalence and mortality rates for 2006-2007 and HIV incidence rates for 2006 in Florida.
Overall, the estimated MSM HIV prevalence rates per 100,000 MSM were 7354.8 (2006), and 7758.3 (2007). With white MSM as the referent, MSM HIV prevalence rate ratios (RRs) equaled 3.7 for blacks in 2006 and 3.6 in 2007 and 1.7 for Hispanics in both years (all P < 0.001). Among all MSM with HIV, the mortality rates were 199.8 (2006) and 188.4 (2007), with RRs of 5.4 for blacks in 2006 and 4.9 in 2007, and 1.6 for Hispanics in 2006 and 1.4 in 2007 (all P < 0.001). In 2006, the estimated HIV incidence rate among all MSM was 656.1 per 100,000 MSM, with RRs of 5.5 (blacks) and 2.0 (Hispanics) (both P < 0.001). A sensitivity analysis indicated that error due to misclassification of minority MSM as males who are not MSM lowered rates and RRs for all the 3 indicators but racial/ethnic disparities persisted (all P < 0.001).
The impact of HIV by each measure was greater on black and Hispanic MSM than on white MSM. Quantifying estimates of HIV incidence, HIV prevalence, and mortality rates among MSM with HIV informs HIV surveillance, prevention, treatment, resource allocation, and community mobilization.

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    edited by ECDC, 06/2013; ECDC., ISBN: 978-92-9193-479-9

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