Article

Sex-preselected buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) calves derived from artificial insemination with sexed sperm.

Animal Reproduction Institute, Guangxi Key Laboratory of Subtropical Bio-resource Conservation and Utilization, Guangxi University, Nanning, PR China.
Animal reproduction science (Impact Factor: 1.56). 01/2010; 119(3-4):169-71. DOI: 10.1016/j.anireprosci.2010.01.001
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Flow cytometry sorting of X- and Y-chromosome bearing sperm has been emerging as a promising technology to alter the sex ratio in progenies of mammals in the recent years. The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of AI by using the sexed sperm to produce sex-preselected calves in buffalo species. A total of 43 buffalo cows were inseminated with X-sorted sperm, 30 of which were confirmed pregnant 3 mo following AI. In terms of conception rate, significant difference was observed between AI with sexed sperm derived from different bulls (P<0.05), but not between sexed and non-sexed sperm (P>0.05), nor between heifers and parous buffalo cows (P>0.05). A total of 29 sex-preselected calves, 24 females and 5 males, developed to term and were viable on delivery. Results of this study indicate the feasibility of the application of the sexing technology to accelerate the genetic improvement in swamp buffalo.

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