Article

Nutrient Specific Feeding and Endocrine Effects of Jejunal Infusions

Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA.
Obesity (Impact Factor: 4.39). 05/2010; 18(5):904-10. DOI: 10.1038/oby.2010.14
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Intestinal nutrient infusions result in variable decreases in food intake and body weight based on the nutrient type and the specific intestinal infusion site. Only intrajejunal infusions of fatty acids decrease food intake beyond the calories infused. To test whether this extra-compensatory decrease in food intake is specific to fatty acids, small volume intrajejunal infusions of glucose (Glu) and casein hydrolysate (Cas), as well as linoleic acid (LA) were administered to male Sprague-Dawley rats. Equal kilocalorie (kcal) loads of these nutrients (11.4) or vehicle were infused into the jejunum over 7 h/day for five consecutive days. Food intake was continuously monitored and body weight was measured daily. After the infusion on the final day, rats were killed and plasma collected. Intrajejunal infusions of LA and Glu, but not Cas, suppressed food intake beyond the caloric load of the infusate with no compensatory increase in food intake after the infusion period. Rats receiving LA and Glu infusions also lost significant body weight across the infusion days. Plasma glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) was increased in both the LA and Glu rats compared with control animals, with no significant change in the Cas-infused animals. Peptide YY (PYY) levels increased in response to LA and Cas infusions. These results suggest that intrajejunal infusions of LA and Glu may decrease food intake and body weight via alterations in GLP-1 signaling. Thus, particular nutrients are more effective at producing decreases in food intake, body weight, and inducing changes in peptide levels and could lead to a novel therapy for obesity.

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