Conference Paper

Simple type theory: simple steps towards a formal specification

Dept. of Comput. & Software, McMaster Univ., Hamilton, Ont., Canada
DOI: 10.1109/FIE.2004.1408559 Conference: Frontiers in Education, 2004. FIE 2004. 34th Annual
Source: IEEE Xplore

ABSTRACT Engineers, particularly software engineers, need to know how to read and write precise specifications. Specifications are made precise by expressing them in a formal mathematical language. Simple type theory, also as known as higher-order logic, is an excellent educational and practical tool for creating and understanding formal specifications. It provides a better logical foundation for specification than first-order logic and is a better introductory specification language than industrial specification languages like VDM-SL and Z. For these reasons, we recommend that simple type theory be incorporated into the undergraduate engineering curriculum.

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