Mary S. Easton Center of Alzheimer's Disease Research at UCLA: Advancing the Therapeutic Imperative

Department of Neurology, The Mary S Easton Center for Alzheimer's Disease Research at UCLA, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA.
Journal of Alzheimer's disease: JAD (Impact Factor: 4.15). 01/2010; 19(2):375-88. DOI: 10.3233/JAD-2010-1286
Source: PubMed


The Mary S. Easton Center for Alzheimer's Disease Research (UCLA-Easton Alzheimer's Center) is committed to the "therapeutic imperative" and is devoted to finding new treatments for Alzheimer's disease (AD) and to developing technologies (biomarkers) to advance that goal. The UCLA-Easton Alzheimer's Center has a continuum of research and research-related activities including basic/foundational studies of peptide interactions; translational studies in transgenic animals and other animal models of AD; clinical research to define the phenotype of AD, characterize familial AD, develop biomarkers, and advance clinical trials; health services and outcomes research; and active education, dissemination, and recruitment activities. The UCLAEaston Alzheimer's Center is supported by the National Institutes on Aging, the State of California, and generous donors who share our commitment to developing new therapies for AD. The naming donor (Jim Easton) provided substantial funds to endow the center and to support projects in AD drug discovery and biomarker development. The Sidell-Kagan Foundation supports the Katherine and Benjamin Kagan Alzheimer's Treatment Development Program, and the Deane F. Johnson Alzheimer's Research Foundation supports the Deane F. Johnson Center for Neurotherapeutics at UCLA. The John Douglas French Alzheimer's Research Foundation provides grants to junior investigators in critical periods of their academic development. The UCLA-Easton Alzheimer's Center partners with community organizations including the Alzheimer's Association California Southland Chapter and the Leeza Gibbons memory Foundation. Collaboration with pharmaceutical companies, biotechnology companies, and device companies is critical to developing new therapeutics for AD and these collaborations are embraced in the mission of the UCLA-Easton Alzheimer's Center. The Center supports excellent senior 3 investigators and serves as an incubator for new scientists, agents, models, technologies and concepts that will significantly influence the future of AD treatment and AD research.

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    • "The National Alzheimer's Coordinating Center (NACC) [259] has developed a " uniform data set " to submit the information related to neuropathological and epidemiological details of AD and propagate them among the basic researchers for a better development of preclinical studies. The Mary S. Easton Center for Alzheimer's Disease Research at UCLA has also been developed to co-ordinate research among the AD researchers and clinicians [260]. New programs such as these will train researchers who can integrate "
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    ABSTRACT: Preclinical studies are essential for translation to disease treatments and effective use in clinical practice. An undue emphasis on single approaches to Alzheimer's disease (AD) appears to have retarded the pace of translation in the field, and there is much frustration in the public about the lack of an effective treatment. We critically reviewed past literature (1990-2014), analyzed numerous data, and discussed key issues at a consensus conference on Brain Ageing and Dementia to identify and overcome roadblocks in studies intended for translation. We highlight various factors that influence the translation of preclinical research and highlight specific preclinical strategies that have failed to demonstrate efficacy in clinical trials. The field has been hindered by the domination of the amyloid hypothesis in AD pathogenesis while the causative pathways in disease pathology are widely considered to be multifactorial. Understanding the causative events and mechanisms in the pathogenesis are equally important for translation. Greater efforts are necessary to fill in the gaps and overcome a variety of confounds in the generation, study design, testing, and evaluation of animal models and the application to future novel anti-dementia drug trials. A greater variety of potential disease mechanisms must be entertained to enhance progress.
    Journal of Alzheimer's disease: JAD 09/2015; 47(4):815-843. DOI:10.3233/JAD-150136 · 4.15 Impact Factor


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