Article

"Does Periodontal Therapy Reduce the Risk for Systemic Diseases?"

Department of Oral Biology, School of Dental Medicine, University at Buffalo, The State University of New York, Foster Hall, Buffalo, NY 14214, USA.
Dental clinics of North America 01/2010; 54(1):163-81. DOI: 10.1016/j.cden.2009.10.002
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Periodontal disease is treated by various approaches, including simple oral hygiene practices, professional mechanical debridement, antimicrobial therapy and periodontal surgery. There is evidence to associate periodontal disease with several systemic diseases and conditions, including myocardial infarction, adverse pregnancy outcomes, diabetes mellitus, and respiratory disease. This article reviews the published literature that describes the effects of periodontal treatment on cardiovascular diseases, adverse pregnancy outcomes, diabetes mellitus, and respiratory disease. While some progress has been made, further research is required to understand the value of periodontal interventions in the prevention of systemic diseases.

Download full-text

Full-text

Available from: Frank Scannapieco, Aug 17, 2015
6 Followers
 · 
176 Views
  • Source
    • "Knowledge about the link between periodontal disease and systemic health is growing rapidly. Increasing evidence is available indicating periodontitis as a risk factor for various systemic diseases such as cardiovascular diseases, diabetes mellitus, low birth weight infants and pulmonary diseases (Cullinan et al., 2009; Scannapieco et al., 2010). To date, the bulk of evidence points to the higher levels of circulating periodontal bacterial components, such as endotoxins, that could travel via blood to other organs in the body and cause harm (Dave and Van Dyke, 2008). "
  • Source
    • "Knowledge about the link between periodontal disease and systemic health is growing rapidly. Increasing evidence is available indicating periodontitis as a risk factor for various systemic diseases such as cardiovascular diseases, diabetes mellitus, low birth weight infants and pulmonary diseases (Cullinan et al., 2009; Scannapieco et al., 2010). To date, the bulk of evidence points to the higher levels of circulating periodontal bacterial components, such as endotoxins, that could travel via blood to other organs in the body and cause harm (Dave and Van Dyke, 2008). "
  • Source
    • "Chronic periodontitis is a common disease of adults, and leads to significant treatment costs and to loss of teeth. It has been associated with a number of systemic diseases and conditions (Scannapieco et al., 2010), such as cardiovascular disease and diabetes, and interactions may contribute to these systemic diseases. Chronic periodontitis has a complex etiology dependent on the bacterial community residing in the gingival sulcus. "
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Periodontitis has a polymicrobial etiology within the framework of a complex microbial ecosystem. With advances in sequencing technologies, comprehensive studies to elucidate bacterial community differences have recently become possible. We used 454 sequencing of 16S rRNA genes to compare subgingival bacterial communities from 29 periodontally healthy controls and 29 subjects with chronic periodontitis. Amplicons from both the V1-2 and V4 regions of the 16S gene were sequenced, yielding 1,393,579 sequences. They were identified by BLAST against a curated oral 16S database, and mapped to 16 phyla, 106 genera, and 596 species. 81% of sequences could be mapped to cultivated species. Differences between health- and periodontitis-associated bacterial communities were observed at all phylogenetic levels, and UniFrac and principal coordinates analysis showed distinct community profiles in health and disease. Community diversity was higher in disease, and 123 species were identified that were significantly more abundant in disease, and 53 in health. Spirochaetes, Synergistetes and Bacteroidetes were more abundant in disease, whereas the Proteobacteria were found at higher levels in healthy controls. Within the phylum Firmicutes, the class Bacilli was health-associated, whereas the Clostridia, Negativicutes and Erysipelotrichia were associated with disease. These results implicate a number of taxa that will be targets for future research. Some, such as Filifactor alocis and many Spirochetes were represented by a large fraction of sequences as compared with previously identified targets. Elucidation of these differences in community composition provides a basis for further understanding the pathogenesis of periodontitis.
    The ISME Journal 12/2011; 6(6):1176-85. DOI:10.1038/ismej.2011.191 · 9.27 Impact Factor
Show more

Similar Publications