Article

Transglutaminase 2 is expressed and active on the surface of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells and macrophages.

Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, University of Debrecen, Debrecen, Hungary.
Immunology letters (Impact Factor: 2.37). 12/2009; 130(1-2):74-81. DOI: 10.1016/j.imlet.2009.12.010
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT The multifunctional enzyme, transglutaminase 2 (TG2), can be found intracellularly, in the extracellular matrix and on the cell surface. Cell surface TG2 (csTG2) could not be detected by TG2-specific antibodies or autoantibodies on immunocompetent cells. A supposedly csTG2-specific antibody, 6B9, was recently shown to actually react with CD44. Though the importance of TG2-mediated deamidation of gluten in the pathogenesis of celiac disease has been well recognized, it is not known in which intestinal cells or cell compartment the deamidation occurs. Duodenal dendritic cells (DCs) can be directly involved in gluten-reactive T-cell activation. Here we use blood monocyte-derived dendritic cells (iDC) and macrophages (MPhi) as a model for intestinal antigen-presenting cells (APCs) and show that they contain large amounts of TG2. We found that TG100, a commercial TG2-specific monoclonal antibody can recognize TG2 on the surface of these cells, that is monocyte-derived APCs express surface-associated TG2. TG2 expression was found on the surface of individual tunica propria cells in frozen small bowel tissue sections from both normal and celiac subjects. We also demonstrate that the pool of TG2 on the surface of iDCs can be catalytically active, hence it might directly be involved in the deamidation of gliadin peptides. Bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) increased the level of TG2 on the surface of maturing DCs, supporting the hypothesis that an unspecific inflammatory process in the gut may expose more transglutaminase activity.

0 Followers
 · 
102 Views
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Infiltration of leukocytes is a major pathological event in white matter lesion formation in the brain of multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. In grey matter lesions, less infiltration of these cells occur, but microglial activation is present. Thus far, the interaction of β-integrins with extracellular matrix proteins, e.g. fibronectin, is considered to be of importance for the influx of immune cells. Recent in vitro studies indicate a possible role for the enzyme tissue Transglutaminase (TG2) in mediating cell adhesion and migration. In the present study we questioned whether TG2 is present in white and grey matter lesions observed in the marmoset model for MS. To this end, immunohistochemical studies were performed. We observed that TG2, expressed by infiltrating monocytes in white matter lesions co-expressed β1-integrin and is located in close apposition to deposited fibronectin. These data suggest an important role for TG2 in the adhesion and migration of infiltrating monocytes during white matter lesion formation. Moreover, in grey matter lesions, TG2 is mainly present in microglial cells together with some β1-integrin, whereas fibronectin is absent in these lesions. These data imply an alternative role for microglial-derived TG2 in grey matter lesions, e.g. cell proliferation. Further research should clarify the functional role of TG2 in monocytes or microglial cells in MS lesion formation.
    PLoS ONE 06/2014; 9(6):e100574. DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0100574 · 3.53 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Dendritic cells (DCs) are part of the innate immune system with a key role in initiating and modulating T cell mediated immune responses. Coeliac disease is caused by inappropriate activation of such a response leading to small intestinal inflammation when gluten is ingested. Tissue transglutaminase, an extracellular matrix (ECM) protein, has an established role in coeliac disease; however, little work to date has examined its impact on DCs. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of small intestinal ECM proteins, fibronectin (FN) and tissue transglutaminase 2 (TG-2), on human DCs by including these proteins in DC cultures.The study used flow cytometry and scanning electron microscopy to determine the effect of FN and TG-2 on phenotype, endocytic ability and and morphology of DCs. Furthermore, DCs treated with FN and TG-2 were cultured with T cells and subsequent T cell proliferation and cytokine profile was determined.The data indicate that transglutaminase affected DCs in a concentration-dependent manner. High concentrations were associated with a more mature phenotype and increased ability to stimulate T cells, while lower concentrations led to maintenance of an immature phenotype.These data provide support for an additional role for transglutaminase in coeliac disease and demonstrate the potential of in vitro modelling of coeliac disease pathogenesis.
    BMC Immunology 04/2012; 13(1):20. DOI:10.1186/1471-2172-13-20 · 2.25 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Celiac disease is a chronic small bowel disorder caused by an abnormal immune response to an array of epitopes of wheat gluten and related proteins of rye and barley in genetically susceptible individuals who express the HLA-DQ2/-DQ8 haplotype. Gluten peptides are efficiently presented by celiac disease-specific HLA-DQ2- and HLA-DQ8-positive antigen presenting cells to CD4(+) T-cells that, once activated, drive a T helper cell type 1 response leading to the development of the typical celiac lesion-villous atrophy, crypt hyperplasia and intraepithelial and lamina propria infiltration of inflammatory cells. Tissue transglutaminase (tTG) is a calcium dependent ubiquitous enzyme which catalyses posttranslational modification of proteins and is released from cells during inflammation. tTG is suggested to exert at least two crucial roles in celiac disease: as a deamidating enzyme, that can enhance the immunostimulatory effect of gluten, and as a target autoantigen in the immune response. Since glutamine-rich gliadin peptides are excellent substrates for tTG, and the resulting deamidated and thus negatively charged peptides have much higher affinity for the HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8 molecules, the action of tTG is believed to be a key step in the pathogenesis of celiac disease. This review is focused on the function of tTG in celiac disease, although it also deals with novel advances in tTG-based therapies.
    Autoimmunity reviews 02/2012; 11(10):746-53. DOI:10.1016/j.autrev.2012.01.007 · 7.10 Impact Factor