Conference Paper

High-accuracy stereo depth maps using structured light

Middlebury Coll., VT, USA
DOI: 10.1109/CVPR.2003.1211354 Conference: Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition, 2003. Proceedings. 2003 IEEE Computer Society Conference on, Volume: 1
Source: DBLP

ABSTRACT Progress in stereo algorithm performance is quickly outpacing the ability of existing stereo data sets to discriminate among the best-performing algorithms, motivating the need for more challenging scenes with accurate ground truth information. This paper describes a method for acquiring high-complexity stereo image pairs with pixel-accurate correspondence information using structured light. Unlike traditional range-sensing approaches, our method does not require the calibration of the light sources and yields registered disparity maps between all pairs of cameras and illumination projectors. We present new stereo data sets acquired with our method and demonstrate their suitability for stereo algorithm evaluation. Our results are available at http://www.middlebury.edu/stereo/.

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