Article

Daily Oral Everolimus Activity in Patients With Metastatic Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors After Failure of Cytotoxic Chemotherapy: A Phase II Trial

The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio, United States
Journal of Clinical Oncology (Impact Factor: 17.88). 11/2009; 28(1):69-76. DOI: 10.1200/JCO.2009.24.2669
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT PURPOSE No established treatment exists for pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor (NET) progression after failure of chemotherapy. Everolimus (RAD001), an oral inhibitor of mammalian target of rapamycin, in combination with octreotide has demonstrated encouraging antitumor activity in patients with NETs. PATIENTS AND METHODS This open-label, phase II study assessed the clinical activity of everolimus in patients with metastatic pancreatic NETs who experienced progression on or after chemotherapy. Patients were stratified by prior octreotide therapy (stratum 1: everolimus 10 mg/d, n = 115; stratum 2: everolimus 10 mg/d plus octreotide long-acting release [LAR], n = 45). Tumor assessments (using Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors) were performed every 3 months. Chromogranin A (CgA) and neuron-specific enolase (NSE) were assessed monthly if elevated at baseline. Trough concentrations of everolimus and octreotide were assessed. Results By central radiology review, in stratum 1, there were 11 partial responses (9.6%), 78 patients (67.8%) with stable disease (SD), and 16 patients (13.9%) with progressive disease; median progression-free survival (PFS) was 9.7 months. In stratum 2, there were two partial responses (4.4%), 36 patients (80%) with SD, and no patients with progressive disease; median PFS was 16.7 months. Patients with an early CgA or NSE response had a longer PFS compared with patients without an early response. Coadministration of octreotide LAR and everolimus did not impact exposure to either drug. Most adverse events were mild to moderate and were consistent with those previously seen with everolimus. CONCLUSION Daily everolimus, with or without concomitant octreotide LAR, demonstrates antitumor activity as measured by objective response rate and PFS and is well tolerated in patients with advanced pancreatic NETs after failure of prior systemic chemotherapy.

0 Bookmarks
 · 
105 Views
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The patient was an asymptomatic 43-year-old woman. Abdominal ultrasonography and enhanced computed tomography showed a tumor lesion accompanied by multiple cystic changes in the liver and the pancreatic tail. Endoscopic ultrasound-fine needle aspiration was performed on the pancreatic tumor lesion and revealed pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor (PNET). As it was unresectable due to multiple liver metastases, the decision was made to initiate treatment with everolimus and transcatheter arterial chemoembolization. The patient ceased menstruating after the start of everolimus administration. When the administration was discontinued due to interstitial lung disease, menstruation resumed, but then again stopped with everolimus resumption. An association between everolimus and amenorrhea was highly suspected. Amenorrhea occurred as a rare adverse event of everolimus. As the younger women might be included in PNETs patients, we should put this adverse event into consideration.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNETs) are frequently malignant (50-80%, except for insulinoma) and may show an aggressive course with metastases to the liver as well as more distant sites. These heterogeneous neoplasms include functioning tumors, which secrete a variety of peptide hormones, and non-functioning tumors (up to 90% of pNETs), which often show metastases at the time of diagnosis.
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to evaluate efficacy and safety of everolimus in patients with pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNET) by prior chemotherapy use in the RAD001 in Advanced Neuroendocrine Tumors, Third Trial (RADIANT-3). Patients with advanced, progressive, low- or intermediate-grade pNET were prospectively stratified by prior chemotherapy use and World Health Organization performance status and were randomly assigned (1:1) to everolimus 10 mg/d (n = 207) or placebo (n = 203). Of the 410 patients, 204 (50%) were naive to chemotherapy (chemonaive). Baseline characteristics were similar for patients with or without prior chemotherapy. Everolimus significantly prolonged median progression-free survival regardless of prior chemotherapy use (prior chemotherapy: 11.0 vs 3.2 months; hazard ratio, 0.34; 95% confidence interval, 0.25-0.48; P < 0.0001) (chemonaive: 11.4 vs 5.4 months; hazard ratio, 0.42; 95% confidence interval, 0.29-0.60; P < 0.0001). Stable disease was the best overall response in 73% of everolimus-treated patients (151/207). The most common drug-related adverse events included stomatitis (60%-69%), rash (47%-50%), and diarrhea (34%). As more treatment options become available, it is important to consider the goals of treatment and to identify patients who would potentially benefit from a specific therapy. Findings from this planned subgroup analysis suggest the potential for first-line use of everolimus in patients with advanced pNET.This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 3.0 License, where it is permissible to download and share the work provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be changed in any way or used commercially.
    Pancreas 12/2014; DOI:10.1097/MPA.0000000000000262 · 3.01 Impact Factor