Article

Memory, metamemory and their dissociation in temporal lobe epilepsy.

School of Psychology, University of Plymouth, United Kingdom.
Neuropsychologia (Impact Factor: 3.48). 11/2009; 48(4):921-32. DOI: 10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2009.11.011
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Patients with temporal-lobe epilepsy (TLE) present with memory difficulties. The aim of the current study was to determine to what extent these difficulties could be related to a metamemory impairment. Fifteen patients with TLE and 15 matched healthy controls carried out a paired-associates learning task. Memory recall was measured at intervals of 30min and 4 weeks. We employed a combined Judgement-of-Learning (JOL) and Feeling-of-Knowing (FOK) task to investigate whether participants could monitor their memory successfully at both the item-by-item level and the global level. The results revealed a clear deficit of episodic memory in patients with epilepsy compared with controls, but metamemory in TLE patients was intact. Patients were able to monitor their memory successfully at the item-by-item level, and tended to be even more accurate than controls when making global judgements.

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