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  • Pediatric Allergy and Immunology 02/2002; 12(s14):97 - 101. DOI:10.1034/j.1399-3038.2001.121421.x · 3.86 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This review highlights some of the research advances in anaphylaxis and hypersensitivity reactions to foods, drugs, and insects, as well as advances in allergic skin disease that were reported in the Journal in 2009. Among key epidemiologic observations, several westernized countries report that more than 1% of children have peanut allergy, and there is some evidence that environmental exposure to peanut is a risk factor. The role of regulatory T cells, complement, platelet-activating factor, and effector cells in the development and expression of food allergy were explored in several murine models and human studies. Delayed anaphylaxis to mammalian meats appears to be related to IgE binding to the carbohydrate moiety galactose-alpha-1,3-galactose, which also has implications for hypersensitivity to murine mAb therapeutics containing this oligosaccharide. Oral immunotherapy studies continue to show promise for the treatment of food allergy, but determining whether the treatment causes tolerance (cure) or temporary desensitization remains to be explored. Increased baseline serum tryptase levels might inform the risk of venom anaphylaxis and might indicate a risk for mast cell disorders in persons who have experienced such episodes. Reduced structural and immune barrier function contribute to local and systemic allergen sensitization in patients with atopic dermatitis, as well as increased propensity of skin infections in these patients. The use of increased doses of nonsedating antihistamines and potential usefulness of omalizumab for chronic urticaria was highlighted. These exciting advances reported in the Journal can improve patient care today and provide insights on how we can improve the diagnosis and treatment of these allergic diseases in the future.
    The Journal of allergy and clinical immunology 01/2010; 125(1):85-97. DOI:10.1016/j.jaci.2009.11.031 · 11.25 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Anaphylaxis occurs commonly in community settings. The rate of occurrence is increasing, especially in young people. Understanding potential triggers, mechanisms, and patient-specific risk factors for severity and fatality is the key to performing appropriate risk assessment in those who have previously experienced an acute anaphylactic episode. The diagnosis of anaphylaxis is based primarily on clinical criteria and is valid even if the results of laboratory tests, such as serum total tryptase levels, are within normal limits. Positive skin test results or increased serum specific IgE levels to potential triggering allergens confirm sensitization but do not confirm the diagnosis of anaphylaxis because asymptomatic sensitization is common in the general population. Important patient-related risk factors for severity and fatality include age, concomitant diseases, and concurrent medications, as well as other less well-defined factors, such as defects in mediator degradation pathways, fever, acute infection, menses, emotional stress, and disruption of routine. Prevention of anaphylaxis depends primarily on optimal management of patient-related risk factors, strict avoidance of confirmed relevant allergen or other triggers, and, where indicated, immunomodulation (eg, subcutaneous venom immunotherapy to prevent Hymenoptera sting-triggered anaphylaxis, an underused, potentially curative treatment). The benefits and risks of immunomodulation to prevent food-triggered anaphylaxis are still being defined. Epinephrine (adrenaline) is the medication of first choice in the treatment of anaphylaxis. All patients at risk for recurrence in the community should be equipped with 1 or more epinephrine autoinjectors; a written, personalized anaphylaxis emergency action plan; and up-to-date medical identification. Improvements in the design of epinephrine autoinjectors will help to optimize ease of use and safety. Randomized controlled trials of pharmacologic agents, such as antihistamines and glucocorticoids, are needed to strengthen the evidence base for treatment of acute anaphylactic episodes.
    The Journal of allergy and clinical immunology 02/2010; 125(2 Suppl 2):S161-81. DOI:10.1016/j.jaci.2009.12.981 · 11.25 Impact Factor