Multivariate tensor-based morphometry on surfaces: Application to mapping ventricular abnormalities in HIV/AIDS

Laboratory of Neuro Imaging, Department of Neurology, UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA 90095-7332, USA.
NeuroImage (Impact Factor: 6.36). 11/2009; 49(3):2141-57. DOI: 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2009.10.086
Source: PubMed


Here we developed a new method, called multivariate tensor-based surface morphometry (TBM), and applied it to study lateral ventricular surface differences associated with HIV/AIDS. Using concepts from differential geometry and the theory of differential forms, we created mathematical structures known as holomorphic one-forms, to obtain an efficient and accurate conformal parameterization of the lateral ventricular surfaces in the brain. The new meshing approach also provides a natural way to register anatomical surfaces across subjects, and improves on prior methods as it handles surfaces that branch and join at complex 3D junctions. To analyze anatomical differences, we computed new statistics from the Riemannian surface metrics-these retain multivariate information on local surface geometry. We applied this framework to analyze lateral ventricular surface morphometry in 3D MRI data from 11 subjects with HIV/AIDS and 8 healthy controls. Our method detected a 3D profile of surface abnormalities even in this small sample. Multivariate statistics on the local tensors gave better effect sizes for detecting group differences, relative to other TBM-based methods including analysis of the Jacobian determinant, the largest and smallest eigenvalues of the surface metric, and the pair of eigenvalues of the Jacobian matrix. The resulting analysis pipeline may improve the power of surface-based morphometry studies of the brain.

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Article: Multivariate tensor-based morphometry on surfaces: Application to mapping ventricular abnormalities in HIV/AIDS

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    • "Compared with prior work (Jones et al. 2000; Adamson et al. 2011), our partial differential equation (PDE) solving computation may achieve sub-voxel accuracy. Also because surfaces are easily computed from tetrahedral meshes, our method can be easily integrated with prior surface registration work (Wang et al. 2010, 2011, 2013c). Second, we identify areas that show differences in the structure of the CC between early blinds, late blinds and sighted controls. "
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    ABSTRACT: Blindness represents a unique model to study how visual experience may shape the development of brain organization. Exploring how the structure of the corpus callosum (CC) reorganizes ensuing visual deprivation is of particular interest due to its important functional implication in vision (e.g., via the splenium of the CC). Moreover, comparing early versus late visually deprived individuals has the potential to unravel the existence of a sensitive period for reshaping the CC structure. Here, we develop a novel framework to capture a complete set of shape differences in the CC between congenitally blind (CB), late blind (LB) and sighted control (SC) groups. The CCs were manually segmented from T1-weighted brain MRI and modeled by 3D tetrahedral meshes. We statistically compared the combination of local area and thickness at each point between subject groups. Differences in area are found using surface tensor-based morphometry; thickness is estimated by tracing the streamlines in the volumetric harmonic field. Group differences were assessed on this combined measure using Hotelling’s T 2 test. Interestingly, we observed that the total callosal volume did not differ between the groups. However, our fine-grained analysis reveals significant differences mostly localized around the splenium areas between both blind groups and the sighted group (general effects of blindness) and, importantly, specific dissimilarities between the LB and CB groups, illustrating the existence of a sensitive period for reorganization. The new multivariate statistics also gave better effect sizes for detecting morphometric differences, relative to other statistics. They may boost statistical power for CC morphometric analyses.
    Neuroinformatics 02/2015; 13(3). DOI:10.1007/s12021-014-9259-9 · 2.83 Impact Factor
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    • "TBM is a nonlinear registration based approach designed to detect regional differences in brain volume in a cohort, and study factors that affect them (Chiang et al., 2007; Chung et al., 2001; Davatzikos, 1996; Fox et al., 2001; Hua et al., 2013; Shen and Davatzikos, 2003; Studholme et al., 2001; Thompson et al., 2000). Multivariate TBM has been recently applied to study structural abnormalities (Lepore et al., 2008) and lateral ventricular surface differences (Wang et al., 2010) associated with HIV/AIDS. Unlike traditional ROIbased volumetric methods, TBM provides a whole brain voxel-based analysis without requiring any prior anatomical hypothesis about where differences should be found. "
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    ABSTRACT: Cognitive impairment and brain injury are common in people with HIV/AIDS, even when viral replication is effectively suppressed with combined antiretroviral therapies (cART). Metabolic and structural abnormalities may promote cognitive decline, but we know little about how these measures relate in people on stable cART. Here we used tensor-based morphometry (TBM) to reveal the 3D profile of regional brain volume variations in 210 HIV + patients scanned with whole-brain MRI at 1.5 T (mean age: 48.6 ± 8.4 years; all receiving cART). We identified brain regions where the degree of atrophy was related to HIV clinical measures and cerebral metabolite levels assessed with magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). Regional brain volume reduction was linked to lower nadir CD4 + count, with a 1–2% white matter volume reduction for each 25-point reduction in nadir CD4 +. Even so, brain volume measured by TBM showed no detectable association with current CD4 + count, AIDS Dementia Complex (ADC) stage, HIV RNA load in plasma or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), duration of HIV infection, antiretroviral CNS penetration-effectiveness (CPE) scores, or years on cART, after controlling for demographic factors, and for multiple comparisons. Elevated glutamate and glutamine (Glx) and lower N-acetylaspartate (NAA) in the frontal white matter, basal ganglia, and mid frontal cortex — were associated with lower white matter, putamen and thalamus volumes, and ventricular and CSF space expansion. Reductions in brain volumes in the setting of chronic and stable disease are strongly linked to a history of immunosuppression, suggesting that delays in initiating cART may result in imminent and irreversible brain damage.
    Clinical neuroimaging 12/2013; 3:132–142. DOI:10.1016/j.nicl.2013.07.009 · 2.53 Impact Factor
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    • "Many surface-based morphometry studies describe structural differences at the group level, i.e., between different diagnostic groups. More recently, morphometric maps have also been used to classify individual subjects into diagnostic groups (Costafreda et al., 2011; Ferrarini et al., 2008; Kohannim et al., 2010; Sun et al., 2009a; Wang et al., 2010b). In one study (Sun et al., 2009a), maps of cortical gray matter density achieved 86.1% accuracy in discriminating psychotic patients from control subjects, in leave-one-out tests. "
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    ABSTRACT: Many methods have been proposed for computer-assisted diagnostic classification. Full tensor information and machine learning with 3D maps derived from brain images may help detect subtle differences or classify subjects into different groups. Here we develop a new approach to apply tensor-based morphometry to parametric surface models for diagnostic classification. We use this approach to identify cortical surface features for use in diagnostic classifiers. First, with holomorphic 1-forms, we compute an efficient and accurate conformal mapping from a multiply connected mesh to the so-called slit domain. Next, the surface parameterization approach provides a natural way to register anatomical surfaces across subjects using a constrained harmonic map. To analyze anatomical differences, we then analyze the full Riemannian surface metric tensors, which retain multivariate information on local surface geometry. As the number of voxels in a 3D image is large, sparse learning is a promising method to select a subset of imaging features and to improve classification accuracy. Focusing on vertices with greatest effect sizes, we train a diagnostic classifier using the surface features selected by an L1-norm based sparse learning method. Stability selection is applied to validate the selected feature sets. We tested the algorithm on MRI-derived cortical surfaces from 42 subjects with genetically confirmed Williams syndrome and 40 age-matched controls, multivariate statistics on the local tensors gave greater effect sizes for detecting group differences relative to other TBM-based statistics including analysis of the Jacobian determinant and the largest eigenvalue of the surface metric. Our method also gave reasonable classification results relative to the Jacobian determinant, the pair of eigenvalues of the Jacobian matrix and volume features. This analysis pipeline may boost the power of morphometry studies, and may assist with image-based classification.
    NeuroImage 02/2013; 74:209–230. DOI:10.1016/j.neuroimage.2013.02.011 · 6.36 Impact Factor
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