Article

Public health advocacy in the courts: opportunities for public health professionals.

Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA.
Public Health Reports (Impact Factor: 1.64). 01/2009; 124(6):889-94.
Source: PubMed

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Available from: Shannon Frattaroli, Feb 05, 2014
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