Article

Direct visualization of disulfide bonds through diselenide proxies using 77Se NMR spectroscopy.

Institute for Molecular Bioscience, The University of Queensland, St. Lucia QLD 4072, Australia.
Angewandte Chemie International Edition (Impact Factor: 11.34). 11/2009; 48(49):9312-4. DOI: 10.1002/anie.200905206
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Se-ing is believing: Many proteins are cross-braced by disulfide bonds that frequently play key roles in protein structure, folding, and function. Unfortunately, the methods available for assignment of disulfide-bond connectivities in proteins are technically difficult and prone to misinterpretation. Now disulfide bond connectivities in native proteins can be visualized directly using 77Se NMR spectroscopy.

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