Article

Two plus two equals three? Do we need to rethink lifetime prevalence?

Department of Epidemiology, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, Department of Psychiatry, College of Physicians and Surgeons, and New York State Psychiatric Institute, USA.
Psychological Medicine (Impact Factor: 5.43). 10/2009; 40(6):895-7. DOI: 10.1017/S0033291709991504
Source: PubMed
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