Article

A tensor model and measures of microscopic anisotropy for double-wave-vector diffusion-weighting experiments with long mixing times.

Department of Systems Neuroscience, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany.
Journal of Magnetic Resonance (Impact Factor: 2.3). 10/2009; 202(1):43-56. DOI: 10.1016/j.jmr.2009.09.015
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Experiments with two diffusion-weighting periods applied successively in a single experiment, so-called double-wave-vector (DWV) diffusion-weighting experiments, are a promising tool for the investigation of material or tissue structure on a microscopic level, e.g. to determine cell or compartment sizes or to detect pore or cell anisotropy. However, the theoretical descriptions presented so far for experiments that aim to investigate the microscopic anisotropy with a long mixing time between the two diffusion weightings, are limited to certain wave vector orientations, specific pore shapes, and macroscopically isotropic samples. Here, the signal equations for fully restricted diffusion are re-investigated in more detail. A general description of the signal behavior for arbitrary wave vector directions, pore or cell shapes, and orientation distributions of the pores or cells is obtained that involves a fourth-order tensor approach. From these equations, a rotationally invariant measure of the microscopic anisotropy, termed MA, is derived that yields information complementary to that of the (macroscopic) anisotropy measures of standard diffusion-tensor acquisitions. Furthermore, the detailed angular modulation for arbitrary cell shapes with an isotropic orientation distribution is derived. Numerical simulations of the MR signal with a Monte-Carlo algorithms confirm the theoretical considerations. The extended theoretical description and the introduction of a reliable measure of the microscopic anisotropy may help to improve the applicability and reliability of corresponding experiments.

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