Article

Outcome of Surgical Endodontic Treatment Performed by a Modern Technique: A Meta-analysis of Literature

Department of Endodontology, Maurice and Gabriela Goldschleger School of Dental Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel.
Journal of endodontics (Impact Factor: 2.79). 11/2009; 35(11):1505-11. DOI: 10.1016/j.joen.2009.07.025
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Numerous studies dealing with the outcome of surgical endodontic treatment have been published. However, study design, treatment protocols, follow-up periods, and inclusion and exclusion criteria are extremely variable. Thus, variable and confusing results have been reported. The aim of the present study was to assess the outcome of surgical endodontic treatment performed with a modern technique and to evaluate factors influencing the outcome by means of a meta-analysis.
An exhaustive literature search combined with strict inclusion and exclusion criteria was undertaken to identify prospective case series or randomized clinical trials that deal with surgical endodontic treatment.
A successful outcome in a follow-up of more than 1 year postoperatively was 91.6%. Age, gender, tooth type, root-end filling material, and magnification type had no significant effect on the proportion of success.
Surgical endodontic treatment done by using a modern technique is a predictable treatment. Additional large-scale prospective clinical studies are needed to evaluate possible predictors of success and failure.

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    • "These lesions require the removal of infected dentin root-apex and large portions of periapical bone tissue [2] and the filling of the root-apex cavity with a root-end sealing material preferably biocompatible, osteoconductive or osteoinductive. The failure rate of surgical root-end therapy with conventional materials, such as zinc-oxide cements and silver-amalgam, was reported approximately as 8–24% [3] [4] [5] [6]. The consequences are bone resorption and tooth extraction. "
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    • "These lesions require the removal of infected dentin root-apex and large portions of periapical bone tissue [2] and the filling of the root-apex cavity with a root-end sealing material preferably biocompatible, osteoconductive or osteoinductive. The failure rate of surgical root-end therapy with conventional materials, such as zinc-oxide cements and silver-amalgam, was reported approximately as 8–24% [3] [4] [5] [6]. The consequences are bone resorption and tooth extraction. "
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