Interaction of yeast eIF4G with spliceosome components: Implications in pre-mRNA processing events

Wellcome Trust Centre for Cell Biology, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK.
RNA biology (Impact Factor: 4.97). 11/2009; 6(5):563-74. DOI: 10.4161/rna.6.5.9861
Source: PubMed


As evidenced from mammalian cells the eukaryotic translation initiation factor eIF4G has a putative role in nuclear RNA metabolism. Here we investigate whether this role is conserved in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Using a combination of in vitro and in vivo methods, we show that, similar to mammalian eIF4G, yeast eIF4G homologues, Tif4631p and Tif4632p, are present both in the nucleus and the cytoplasm. We show that both eIF4G proteins interact efficiently in vitro with UsnRNP components of the splicing machinery. More specifically, Tif4631p and Tif4632p interact efficiently with U1 snRNA in vitro. In addition, Tif4631p and Tif4632p associate with protein components of the splicing machinery, namely Snu71p and Prp11p. To further delineate these interactions, we map the regions of Tif4631p and Tif4632p that are important for the interaction with Prp11p and Snu71p and we show that addition of these regions to splicing reactions in vitro has a dominant inhibitory effect. The observed interactions implicate eIF4G in aspects of pre-mRNA processing. In support of this hypothesis, deletion of one of the eIF4G isoforms results in accumulation of un-spliced precursors for a number of endogenous genes, in vivo. In conclusion these observations are suggestive of the involvement of yeast eIF4G in pre-mRNA metabolism.

Download full-text


Available from: Barrass J David, Apr 09, 2014
31 Reads
  • Source
    • "Figure 6 shows that in untreated cells, as has been shown previously [61], the majority of eIF4G is cytoplasmic as expected for a translation initiation factor. As has been observed in S. cerevisiae and human cells [62], [63], a small amount of eIF4G is also present in the nucleus, where it is proposed to couple RNA processing events in the nucleus with translation in the cytoplasm. In contrast to the situation with eIF4G, the majority of the SUMO protein is present in the nucleus (Figures 3 and 6). "
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: SUMO is a small post-translational modifier, that is attached to lysine residues in target proteins. It acts by altering protein-protein interactions, protein localisation and protein activity. SUMO chains can also act as substrates for ubiquitination, resulting in proteasome-mediated degradation of the target protein. SUMO is removed from target proteins by one of a number of specific proteases. The processes of sumoylation and desumoylation have well documented roles in DNA metabolism and in the maintenance of chromatin structure. To further analyse the role of this modification, we have purified protein complexes containing the S. pombe SUMO protease, Ulp2. These complexes contain proteins required for ribosome biogenesis, RNA stability and protein synthesis. Here we have focussed on two translation initiation factors that we identified as co-purifying with Ulp2, eIF4G and eIF3h. We demonstrate that eIF4G, but not eIF3h, is sumoylated. This modification is increased under conditions that produce cytoplasmic stress granules. Consistent with this we observe partial co-localisation of eIF4G and SUMO in stressed cells. Using HeLa cells, we demonstrate that human eIF4GI is also sumoylated; in vitro studies indicate that human eIF4GI is modified on K1368 and K1588, that are located in the C-terminal eIF4A- and Mnk-binding sites respectively.
    PLoS ONE 05/2014; 9(5):e94182. DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0094182 · 3.23 Impact Factor
  • Source
    • "Reduced steady state levels of eIF4Gp in the myo1Δ strains are thought to reduce the number of translation initiation events. However, eIF4Gp is also present in yeast spliceosomes and genetic depletion of Tif4631p, one of the two eIF4Gp homologues in yeast, affects the splicing of a small number of pre-mRNAs that correspond to ribosomal proteins [39]. Of the three representative RP genes tested in our study, two pre-mRNAs have introns, RPL7B has 2 introns, and RPS8A has a 5'UTR intron. "
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Saccharomyces cerevisiae myosin type II-deficient (myo1Δ) strains remain viable and divide, despite the absence of a cytokinetic ring, by activation of the PKC1-dependent cell wall integrity pathway (CWIP). Since the myo1Δ transcriptional fingerprint is a subset of the CWIP fingerprint, the myo1Δ strain may provide a simplified paradigm for cell wall stress survival. To explore the post-transcriptional regulation of the myo1Δ stress response, 1,301 differentially regulated ribosome-bound mRNAs were identified by microarray analysis of which 204 were co-regulated by transcription and translation. Four categories of mRNA were significantly affected - protein biosynthesis, metabolism, carbohydrate metabolism, and unknown functions. Nine genes of the 20 CWIP fingerprint genes were post-transcriptionally regulated. Down and up regulation of selected ribosomal protein and cell wall biosynthesis mRNAs was validated by their distribution in polysomes from wild type and myo1Δ strains. Western blot analysis revealed accumulation of the phosphorylated form of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2 (eIF2α-P) and a reduction in the steady state levels of the translation initiation factor eIF4Gp in myo1Δ strains. Deletion of GCN2 in myo1Δ abolished eIF2αp phosphorylation, and showed a severe growth defect. The presence of P-bodies in myo1Δ strains suggests that the process of mRNA sequestration is active, however, the three representative down regulated RP mRNAs, RPS8A, RPL3 and RPL7B were present at equivalent levels in Dcp2p-mCh-positive immunoprecipitated fractions from myo1Δ and wild type cells. These same RP mRNAs were also selectively co-precipitated with eIF2α-P in myo1Δ strains. Quantitative analysis of ribosome-associated mRNAs and their polyribosome distributions suggests selective regulation of mRNA translation efficiency in myo1Δ strains. Inhibition of translation initiation factor eIF2α (eIF2α-P) in these strains was by Gcn2p-dependent phosphorylation. The increase in the levels of eIF2α-P; the genetic interaction between GCN2 and MYO1; and the reduced levels of eIF4Gp suggest that other signaling pathways, in addition to the CWIP, may be important for myo1Δ strain survival. Selective co-immunoprecipitation of RP mRNAs with eIF2α-P in myo1Δ strains suggests a novel mode of translational regulation. These results indicate that post-transcriptional control is important in the myo1Δ stress response and possibly other stresses in yeast.
    BMC Genomics 12/2010; 11(1):690. DOI:10.1186/1471-2164-11-690 · 3.99 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Small nuclear and nucleolar RNAs that program pre-mRNA splicing and rRNA processing have a signature 5'-trimethylguanosine (TMG) cap. Whereas the mechanism of TMG synthesis by Tgs1 methyltransferase has been elucidated, we know little about whether or how RNP biogenesis, structure and function are perturbed when TMG caps are missing. Here, we analyzed RNPs isolated by tandem-affinity purification from TGS1 and tgs1Δ yeast strains. The protein and U-RNA contents of total SmB-containing RNPs were similar. Finer analysis revealed stoichiometric association of the nuclear cap-binding protein (CBP) subunits Sto1 and Cbc2 with otherwise intact Mud1- and Nam8-containing U1 snRNPs from tgs1Δ cells. CBP was not comparably enriched in Lea1-containing U2 snRNPs from tgs1Δ cells. Moreover, CBP was not associated with mature Nop58-containing C/D snoRNPs or mature Cbf5- and Gar1-containing H/ACA snoRNPs from tgs1Δ cells. The protein composition and association of C/D snoRNPs with the small subunit (SSU) processosome were not grossly affected by absence of TMG caps, nor was the composition of H/ACA snoRNPs. The cold-sensitive (cs) growth defect of tgs1Δ yeast cells could be suppressed by mutating the cap-binding pocket of Cbc2, suggesting that ectopic CBP binding to the exposed U1 m(7)G cap in tgs1Δ cells (not lack of TMG caps per se) underlies the cs phenotype.
    Nucleic Acids Research 05/2011; 39(15):6715-28. DOI:10.1093/nar/gkr279 · 9.11 Impact Factor
Show more