• Source
    • "But QDEX1 has a larger clear aperture to minimize energy deposition from the outgoing beam. At present three QD0 L*s, 3.5, 4.0 and 4.5 m, are studied and different QDEX1 designs exist for three different extraction line starting points [3]. Further from the IP there is a second set of magnets, the QF1 grouping, with properties similar to those of the QD0 grouping. "
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The ILC beam delivery system (BDS) uses a variety of superconducting magnets to maximize luminosity and minimize background. Compact final focus quadrupoles with multifunction correction coils focus incoming beams to few nanometer spot sizes while focusing outgoing disrupted beams into a separate extraction beam line. Anti-solenoids mitigate effects from overlapping focusing and the detector solenoid field. Far from the interaction point (IP) strong octupoles help minimize IP backgrounds. A low-field but very large aperture dipole is integrated with the detector solenoid to reduce backgrounds from beamstrahlung pairs generated at the IP. Physics requirements and magnetic design solutions for the BDS superconducting magnets are reviewed in this paper.
    Particle Accelerator Conference, 2007. PAC. IEEE; 07/2007
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This paper describes the current status and plans of the on-going work to develop an alternative interaction region for the ILC with a 2 mrad crossing-angle. In the past year, a new design has been produced, following simpler concepts and assumptions in order to be as economical as possible.
    Particle Accelerator Conference, 2007. PAC. IEEE; 07/2007
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: More or less 30 years ago, it was experimentally demonstrated how a bent crystal can become a magnet: an object 1 mm thick, a couple of mm wide and a few cm high is, in fact, capable of steering particles as a dipole of several tens of Tesla. Exploiting this feature, from September 2006 the H8RD22 collaboration is testing several bent crystals in order to develop a crystal based collimation system for LHC: in very high energy accelerators, in fact, the typical multi-stage collimation system (that must be very efficient and must tolerate very high radiation) is expected not to allow to reach the nominal luminosity, limiting it to 40% of the desired value. A bent crystal could play a key role being a clever collimator: it is able to steer particles in a given direction with a high efficiency, thus increasing the cleaning efficiency, reducing the constraints on the alignment of the secondary collimator and finally increasing luminosity. But bent crystals are not only collimation: the radiation emitted by light particles in such crystals could be a real breakthrough for several applications, from the the generation of intense gamma beams for a positron source to the collimation of electron-positron beams at the future linear collider. This study is still an open field, given the constraints on the beam and on the experimental setup. The goal of this thesis work is to give an insight of the physics of bent crystals from several poin ts of view: their behavior with heavy and light particles, the possible applications in different fields and the experimental results obtained in recent beam tests with 400 GeV/c and 180 GeV/c heavy and light particles.
Show more