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Tables of X-Ray Mass Attenuation Coefficients and Mass Energy-Absorption Coefficients

http://physics.nist.gov/PhysRefData/XrayMassCoef/cover.html
Source: OAI

ABSTRACT This page provided by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) presents tables and graphs of the photon mass attenuation coefficient and the mass energy-absorption coefficient for all of the elements Z = 1 to 92, and for 48 compounds and mixtures of radiological interest. The tables cover energies of the photon (x-ray, gamma ray, bremsstrahlung) from 1 keV to 20 MeV. The compilation is intended to be used as reference data in radiation shielding and dosimetry computations.

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