Article

A 50-year follow-up of the incidence of traumatic spinal cord injuries in Western Norway

Department of Neurology, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway.
Spinal Cord (Impact Factor: 1.7). 10/2009; 48(4):313-8. DOI: 10.1038/sc.2009.133
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Retrospective population-based epidemiological study.
To assess the prevalence and temporal trends in the incidence of traumatic spinal cord injuries (TSCI), and demographic and clinical characteristics of an unselected, geographically defined cohort in the period 1952-2001.
The patients were identified from hospital records. Crude rates and age-adjusted rates were calculated for each year. The multivariate relationship between cause of injury, age at injury, decade of injury and gender was examined using a Poisson regression model.
Of 336 patients, 199 patients were alive on 1 January 2002, giving a total prevalence of 36.5 per 100,000 inhabitants. The average annual incidence increased from 5.9 per million in the first decade to 21.2 per million in the last. Mean age at injury was 42.9 years and the male to female ratio 4.7:1. Fall was the most common cause of injury (45.5%), followed by motor vehicle accidents (MVA) (34.2%). The incidence of MVA-related injuries increased during the observation period, especially among men <30 years. The lesion level was cervical in 52.4%, thoracic in 29.5% and lumbar/sacral in 18.2%. The lesion was clinically incomplete in 58.6% and complete in 41.4%. The incidence of fall-related injuries and the proportion of incomplete cervical lesions increased during the observation period, especially among men >60 years.
The incidence of TSCI has increased during the past 50 years. Falls and MVA are potentially preventable causes. The increasing proportion of older patients with cervical lesions poses a challenge to the health system.

Download full-text

Full-text

Available from: Ellen Merete Hagen, Apr 15, 2014
0 Followers
 · 
159 Views
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a devastating condition often affecting young and healthy individuals around the world. This debilitating condition not only creates enormous physical and emotional cost to individuals but also is a significant financial burden to society at large. This review was undertaken to understand the global impact of SCI on society. We also attempted to summarize the worldwide demographics and preventative strategies for SCI in varying economic and climatic environments and to evaluate how cultural and economic differences affect the etiology of SCI. A PUBMED database search was performed in order to identify clinical epidemiological studies of SCI within the last decade. In addition, World Bank and World Health Organization websites were used to obtain demographics, economics, and health statistics of countries of interest. A total of 20 manuscripts were selected from 17 countries. We found that SCI varies in etiology, male-to-female ratios, age distributions, and complications in different countries. Nations with similar economies tend to have similar features and incidences in all the above categories. However, diverse methods of classifying SCI were found, making comparisons difficult. Based upon these findings, it is clear that the categorization and evaluation of SCI must be standardized. The authors suggest improved methods of reporting in the areas of etiology, neurological classification, and incidence of SCI so that, in the future, more useful global comprehensive studies and comparisons can be undertaken. Unified injury prevention programs should be implemented through methods involving the Internet and international organizations, targeting the different etiologies of SCI found in different countries.
    Journal of Neurotrauma 11/2004; 21(10):1355-70. DOI:10.1089/neu.2004.21.1355 · 3.97 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: To determine and analyze the influence of age, gender, type of injury, and ethnicity in the length of stay (LoS) of in-patient rehabilitation unit patients after traumatic spinal cord injury (TSCI) and non- traumatic spinal cord injury (NTSCI). We conducted a retrospective study of all patients who completed the TSCI and NTSCI rehabilitation program at Sultan Bin Abdulaziz Humanitarian City, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia from January 2005 to October 2008. Admission records of 495 traumatic spinal cord injured (male 404, female 91; mean age 34.30.68 years) and 126 non-traumatic spinal cord injured patients (male 81, female 45; mean age 451.56 years) were identified. We excluded patients aged < or = 10 and > or = 81 years due to the small proportion. The influence of age, gender, type of injury, and ethnic differences in the LoS were analyzed. Compared with TSCI, patients with NTSCI had a significantly (p=0.035) shorter LoS (58.8+/-1.68, 46.2+/-2.1). The frequency of the TSCI was higher in the 21-30 age groups and lower in the 71-80 age group. Compared with TSCI, the frequency of NTSCI was less in all age groups. The LoS of male was longer than the female in all age groups. The LoS of Saudi patients were higher in TSCI (p=0.021) and NTSCI rehabilitation program compared with the non-Saudis. The results of the study suggest that the gender, types of injury, and ethnicity differences were influencing factors of LoS of traumatic and non traumatic spinal cord injured patients.
    Saudi medical journal 05/2010; 31(5):555-9. · 0.55 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: To assess the temporal trends in the incidence and demographic characteristics of traumatic spinal cord injury (TSCI) with clinical concomitant traumatic brain injury (TBI), in an unselected, geographically defined cohort, 1952-2001. The patients were identified from hospital records. TBI was classified as none, mild, moderate, and severe. Of 336 patients, 157 (46.7%) patients had a clinical concomitant TBI. Clinical TBI was classified as mild in 30.1%, moderate in 11.0% and severe in 5.7%. The average annual incidence increased from 3.3 per million in the first decade to 10.7 per million in the last. Alcohol was the strongest risk factor of clinical TBI (OR = 3.69) followed by completeness of TSCI (OR = 2.18). The incidence of TSCI with concomitant TBI has increased during the last 50 years. Alcohol and completeness of injury are strong risk factors. Increased awareness of dual diagnoses is necessary.
    Acta neurologica Scandinavica. Supplementum 07/2010; DOI:10.1111/j.1600-0404.2010.01376.x
Show more