Article

Minimizing catheter-related bloodstream infections: one unit's approach.

Gwinnett Medical Center, Gwinnett Women's Pavilion, Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, Lawrenceville, Georgia 30046, USA.
Advances in Neonatal Care 10/2009; 9(5):209-26; quiz 227-8. DOI: 10.1097/01.ANC.0000361183.81612.ec
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI) is the most common complication related to peripherally inserted central catheters in the neonatal intensive care unit. CRBSIs are responsible for many morbidities and mortalities occurring in special care nurseries. However, these vascular access devices are an essential aspect of neonatal care and therefore are indispensable. To minimize CRBSI incidences and improve patient outcomes, objectives must be established to focus on the prevention of these potentially life-threatening infections. This article identifies the interventions incorporated by our facility to prevent nosocomial bloodstream infections.

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