Article

Should physical activity programs be tailored when older adults have compromised function?

Dept. of Health and Exercise Science, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, NC, USA.
Journal of aging and physical activity (Impact Factor: 1.41). 07/2009; 17(3):294-306.
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT The purpose of this study was to determine whether a walking program supplemented by tasks designed to challenge balance and mobility (WALK+) could improve physical function more than a traditional walking program (WALK) in older adults at risk for mobility disability. 31 community-dwelling older adults (M +/- SD age = 76 +/- 5 yr; Short Physical Performance Battery [SPPB] score = 8.4 +/- 1.7) were randomized to treatment. Both interventions were 18 sessions (1 hr, 3x/wk) and progressive in intensity and duration. Physical function was assessed using the SPPB and the 400-m-walk time. A subset of participants in the WALK group who had relatively lower baseline function showed only small improvement in their SPPB scores after the intervention (0.3 +/- 0.5), whereas a subset of participants in the WALK+ group with low baseline function showed substantial improvement in their SPPB scores (2.2 +/- 0.7). These preliminary data underscore the potential importance of tailoring interventions for older adults based on baseline levels of physical function.

Download full-text

Full-text

Available from: Anthony P Marsh, Aug 07, 2015
2 Followers
 · 
113 Views
  • Source
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) largely affects older adults. Few interventions have sought to improve functional status and health-related quality of life (HRQL) during treatment. The objective of this study is to examine the feasibility of an exercise intervention among older adults with AML undergoing induction chemotherapy. Pilot study of adults ≥50 years of age hospitalized for AML chemotherapy. The four week exercise intervention included stretching, walking, and strength exercises. Feasibility measures included recruitment, retention, number of exercise sessions completed, and barriers to participation. Physical function, HRQL, depression, and distress were assessed at baseline (week 1), upon completion of intervention (week 5), and during follow-up (weeks 9-13). Exploratory analyses used repeated measures ANCOVA to model changes over time. Among 55 eligible inpatients, 24 enrolled (43.6%). Mean age was 65.1 years (SD 7.8). 87.5% of participants completed baseline measures; 70.8% attended ≥1 exercise sessions, and 50.0% completed post-intervention assessment. Among baseline characteristics, only higher physical performance was associated with greater number of exercise sessions attended (p=0.001). Post intervention, HRQL and depressive symptoms improved (p <0.05). Recruitment to an exercise intervention was feasible. Exercise shows promise to maintain physical function and enhance HRQL. Strategies to enhance adherence to exercise are needed to maximize benefit.
    Journal of Geriatric Oncology 01/2011; 2(1):11-17. DOI:10.1016/j.jgo.2010.10.004 · 1.15 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The efficacy of non-pharmacological intervention approaches such as physical activity, strength, and cognitive training for improving brain health has not been established. Before definitive trials are mounted, important design questions on participation/adherence, training and interventions effects must be answered to more fully inform a full-scale trial. SHARP-P was a single-blinded randomized controlled pilot trial of a 4-month physical activity training intervention (PA) and/or cognitive training intervention (CT) in a 2 × 2 factorial design with a health education control condition in 73 community-dwelling persons, aged 70-85 years, who were at risk for cognitive decline but did not have mild cognitive impairment. Intervention attendance rates were higher in the CT and PACT groups: CT: 96%, PA: 76%, PACT: 90% (p=0.004), the interventions produced marked changes in cognitive and physical performance measures (p≤0.05), and retention rates exceeded 90%. There were no statistically significant differences in 4-month changes in composite scores of cognitive, executive, and episodic memory function among arms. Four-month improvements in the composite measure increased with age among participants assigned to physical activity training but decreased with age for other participants (intervention*age interaction p=0.01). Depending on the choice of outcome, two-armed full-scale trials may require fewer than 1,000 participants (continuous outcome) or 2,000 participants (categorical outcome). Good levels of participation, adherence, and retention appear to be achievable for participants through age 85 years. Care should be taken to ensure that an attention control condition does not attenuate intervention effects. Depending on the choice of outcome measures, the necessary sample sizes to conduct four-year trials appear to be feasible. Clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00688155.
    BMC Geriatrics 05/2011; 11:27. DOI:10.1186/1471-2318-11-27 · 2.00 Impact Factor
Show more