Article

Iron biogeochemistry across marine systems at changing times – progress from the past decade

Biogeosciences (Impact Factor: 3.75). 01/2010; 7(3):1075-1097.
Source: DOAJ

ABSTRACT Based on an international workshop (Gothenburg, 14–16 May 2008), this review article aims to combine interdisciplinary knowledge from coastal and open ocean research on iron biogeochemistry. The major scientific findings of the past decade are structured into sections on natural and artificial iron fertilization, iron inputs into coastal and estuarine systems, colloidal iron and organic matter, and biological processes. Potential effects of global climate change, particularly ocean acidification, on iron biogeochemistry are discussed. The findings are synthesized into recommendations for future research areas.

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