Article

What does nursing teamwork look like? A qualitative study

University of Michigan School of Nursing, 400 N Ingalls St, Ann Arbor, MI 48103, USA.
Journal of nursing care quality (Impact Factor: 1.09). 10/2009; 24(4):298-307. DOI: 10.1097/NCQ.0b013e3181a001c0
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT A qualitative study was conducted applying a theoretically based model of teamwork to determine relevant team processes among nurses. Nurses from 5 patient care units participated in focus groups, describing team processes in their daily work. Responses were analyzed in the Salas framework to develop a concrete conceptualization of teamwork within nursing teams. Results support the framework as a means for describing teamwork among nurses.

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    • "Connelly et al. [5] in their qualitative study of charge nurse competencies described the importance of clinical, critical thinking, organizational, and human relations competencies. Kalisch et al. [6] found in their research that the team leadership skills of charge nurses is key to effective team functioning, and they often performed care that would otherwise be missed by team members. Jasper et al [7] identified three common themes in research done in Wales prior to the development of a program targeted at different levels of leadership including the charge nurse role. "
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    ABSTRACT: A recently issued report from the Institute of Medicine (IOM) in the United States on the Future of Nursing included a recommendation that nurses should receive leadership development at every level in order to transform the healthcare system. Charge nurses, at the frontline of patient care in acute care settings, are in key positions to lead this change. This paper presents findings from research conducted with nurses in the Tenet Health System. Charge nurses from ten facilities who attended a one-day work shop were surveyed to gain insight into the experience of being a frontline leader in today's acute care environment. The relationship of these findings to the IOM report and the implications for both the Tenet Health System and other healthcare organizations that are working to support nurses who assume these challenging roles are discussed.
    11/2011; 2011:164052. DOI:10.5402/2011/164052
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    • "Connelly et al. [5] in their qualitative study of charge nurse competencies described the importance of clinical, critical thinking, organizational, and human relations competencies. Kalisch et al. [6] found in their research that the team leadership skills of charge nurses is key to effective team functioning, and they often performed care that would otherwise be missed by team members. Jasper et al [7] identified three common themes in research done in Wales prior to the development of a program targeted at different levels of leadership including the charge nurse role. "
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    ABSTRACT: The recent Institute of Medicine (2010) report, The Future of Nursing: Leading Change, Advancing Health, included a recommendation that nurses at all levels should be prepared and enabled to lead change to advance health care in the United States. Historically, in most organizations, nursing leadership development programs have focused on nurses in management or executive roles rather than those working in front-line leadership roles. This article describes a front-line leadership development initiative developed by Tenet Healthcare Corporation and attended by 400 charge nurses. Program development, evaluation, and lessons learned that can be applied in other organizations are discussed.
    The Journal of Continuing Education in Nursing 11/2011; 43(4):154-9; quiz 160-1. DOI:10.3928/00220124-20111101-04
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    • "Besides a large sample size, the present study utilized a measurement tool designed specifically for inpatient nursing teams and based on a theory of teamwork that explicates specific teamwork behaviours (i.e. shared mental models, trust, backup, team orientation , leadership etc.) that have been found to be characteristic of effective nursing teamwork (Kalisch et al. 2009). The tool also has demonstrated good psychometric properties for a new tool (Kalisch et al. 2010). "
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    ABSTRACT: kalisch bj, lee h & rochman m. (2010) Journal of Nursing Management 18, 938–947 Nursing staff teamwork and job satisfactionAim The aim of the present study was to explore the influence of unit characteristics, staff characteristics and teamwork on job satisfaction with current position and occupation.Background Teamwork has been associated with a higher level of job satisfaction but few studies have focused on the acute care inpatient hospital nursing team.Methods This was a cross-sectional study with a sample of 3675 nursing staff from five hospitals and 80 patient care units. Participants completed the Nursing Teamwork Survey (NTS).Results Participants’ levels of job satisfaction with current position and satisfaction with occupation were both higher when they rated their teamwork higher (P < 0.001) and perceived their staffing as adequate more often (P < 0.001). Type of unit influenced both satisfaction variables (P < 0.05). Additionally, education, gender and job title influenced satisfaction with occupation (P < 0.05) but not with current position.Conclusions Results of this present study demonstrate that within nursing teams on acute care patient units, a higher level of teamwork and perceptions of adequate staffing leads to greater job satisfaction with current position and occupation.Implications for Nursing Management Findings suggest that efforts to improve teamwork and ensure adequate staffing in acute care settings would have a major impact on staff satisfaction.
    Journal of Nursing Management 10/2010; 18(8):938 - 947. DOI:10.1111/j.1365-2834.2010.01153.x
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