Article

Propolis from Turkey induces apoptosis through activating caspases in human breast carcinoma cell lines.

Celal Bayar University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Histology and Embryology, 35040 Bornova, Izmir, Manisa, Turkey.
Acta histochemica (Impact Factor: 1.76). 10/2009; 112(6):546-56. DOI: 10.1016/j.acthis.2009.06.001
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Propolis is a sticky substance that is collected from plants by honeybees that has anti-mutagenic and anti-carcinogenic properties with biological and therapeutic effects. The target of this study was to investigate the anti-apoptotic effect of propolis extracts (PE) on the caspase pathway in the human breast cell line MCF-7 in culture. Seven different propolis extracts, numbered PE 1-7, produced in their natural ecological environment, were collected from the Hacettepe University Beytepe Campus area in Ankara, Turkey. Individual extracts at 0.5, 0.25, 0.125 and 0.063mg/ml were incubated with MCF-7 cells during 2 days culture. Cell growth and cytotoxicity were measured colorimetrically by MTT assay. Apoptotic cell death was determined by the TUNEL method (terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-biotin nick end-labelling) and caspase activity was investigated by immunocytochemistry using antibodies directed against caspase 6, caspase 8 and caspase 9. The results showed that the PE 5 and 6 extracts at 0.125mg/ml dilution induced apoptosis in association with increased number of TUNEL positive cells. MTT results showed that cultures exposed to the same extracts and at the same dilution experienced better cell growth compared to those cultures exposed to the other extracts. Immunpositivity for all caspases was detected after treatment with all the extracts and at all dilutions, with stronger immunoreactivity for caspase 6 than caspases 8 and 9. Caspase 6 labelling was especially strong in PE 5 and PE 6. We conclude that propolis may have anti-tumour effects by increasing apoptosis through the caspase pathway. Such propolis extracts may be important economically and allow development of a relatively inexpensive cancer treatment.

0 Followers
 · 
94 Views
  • Source
    [Show description] [Hide description]
    DESCRIPTION: Bees are arthropods of Hymenoptera order and are classified into two groups based on their type of life: solitary and social life. Propolis is produced by bees that live socially, from the harvesting of products derived from plants and used to seal and protect the hive against intruders and natural phenomena [1]. Propolis term derives from the Greek Pro, "opposite, the entry" and polis, "city or community" [2,3]. Propolis is a natural substance collected by Apis mellifera bees in several plant species. It has been used in folk medicine for centuries [2,4]. Characteristically, it is a lipophilic material, hard and brittle when cold, but soft, flexible and very sticky when warm. Hence the name "beeswax" [5]. It has characteristic odor and shows adhesive properties of oils and interact strongly with skin proteins [6]. The composition of propolis is complex [7,8].
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: ABSTRACT Propolis is a bee-metabolized resinous substance (bee glue) from plant sap and gums. It has been in usage as a healing agent since antiquity, yet has not garnered global popularity as a health promoter. Its biological effects, which range from antimicrobial, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antidiabetic, dermatoprotective, anti-allergic, laxative and immunomodulatory to anticancer, have been validated. Propolis has shown efficacy against brain, head and neck, skin, breast, liver, pancreas, kidney, bladder, prostate, colon and blood cancers. The inhibition of matrix metalloproteinases, anti-angiogenesis, prevention of metastasis, cell-cycle arrest, induction of apoptosis and moderation of the chemotherapy-induced deleterious side effects have been deduced as the key mechanisms of cancer manipulation. The components conferring antitumor potentials have been identified as caffeic acid phenethyl ester, chrysin, artepillin C, nemorosone, galangin, cardanol, etc. These compounds target various genetic and biochemical pathways of cancer progression. Depending on the botanical sources and the geographical origin, biological activities of propolis vary. Despite phenomenal development in cancer research, conventional therapy falls short in complete malignancy management. The findings obtained so far build hope that propolis as a complementary medicine may address the lacunae. This review documents the recent advances and scope of amendement in cancer remediation with adequate emphasis on the mechanistic aspect of propolis.
    Journal of Dietary Supplements 02/2015; DOI:10.3109/19390211.2015.1008614
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Propolis is a bee-metabolized resinous substance (bee glue) from plant sap and gums. It has been in usage as a healing agent since antiquity, yet has not garnered global popularity as a health promoter. Its biological effects, which range from antimicrobial, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antidiabetic, dermatoprotective, anti-allergic, laxative and immunomodulatory to anticancer, have been validated. Propolis has shown efficacy against brain, head and neck, skin, breast, liver, pancreas, kidney, bladder, prostate, colon and blood cancers. The inhibition of matrix metalloproteinases, anti-angiogenesis, prevention of metastasis, cell-cycle arrest, induction of apoptosis and moderation of the chemotherapy-induced deleterious side effects have been deduced as the key mechanisms of cancer manipulation. The components conferring antitumor potentials have been identified as caffeic acid phenethyl ester, chrysin, artepillin C, nemorosone, galangin, cardanol, etc. These compounds target various genetic and biochemical pathways of cancer progression. Depending on the botanical sources and the geographical origin, biological activities of propolis vary. Despite phenomenal development in cancer research, conventional therapy falls short in complete malignancy management. The findings obtained so far build hope that propolis as a complementary medicine may address the lacunae. This review documents the recent advances and scope of amendement in cancer remediation with adequate emphasis on the mechanistic aspect of propolis.
    Journal of Dietary Supplements 02/2015;