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Available from: Andrew Krahn, Jul 01, 2015
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    ABSTRACT: Extension of electrocardiographic monitoring via loop recorder implantation may increase the diagnostic yield of syncope work-up. In this retrospective observational study, the authors wanted to evaluate the diagnostic performance of implantable loop recorder in the everyday clinical practice. The authors analyzed the electronically stored data of all patients who underwent loop recorder implantation between 2005 and 2014 in their cardiology department because of recurrent syncope of undetermined origin. There were 52 loop recorder implantations within the study period. During the 167 (±136) days of monitoring, 36 (69.2%) diagnostic events occurred. In two-thirds of events, (46.2% of all monitored patients) a specific arrhythmia diagnosis was reached, allowing definitive treatment in these cases. In this selected population, there was no correlation between age, presence of known high-risk predictors, or accompanying trauma, and the mechanism of syncope. The high diagnostic rate of implantable loop recorder in the everyday clinical practice is in accordance with the findings in prospective clinical studies. This observation supports the early application of loop recorder in the diagnostic algorithm of syncope. Orv. Hetil., 2015, 156(15), 609-613.
    Orvosi Hetilap 04/2015; 156(15-15):609-613. DOI:10.1556/OH.2015.30124
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    ABSTRACT: Clinicians who diagnose and manage epilepsy frequently encounter diagnoses of a nonneurological nature, particularly when assessing patients with transient loss of consciousness (T-LOC). Among these, and perhaps the most important, is cardiac syncope. As a group, patients with cardiac syncope have the highest likelihood of subsequent sudden death, and yet, unlike sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) for example, it is the norm for these tragic occurrences to be both easily predictable and preventable. In the 12 months following initial presentation with cardiac syncope, sudden death has been found to be 6 times more common than in those with noncardiac syncope (N Engl J Med 309, 1983, 197). In short, for every patient seen with T-LOC, two fundamental aims of the consultation are to assess the likelihood of cardiac syncope as the cause, and to estimate the risk of future sudden death for the individual. This article aims to outline for the noncardiologist how to recognize cardiac syncope, how to tell it apart from more benign cardiovascular forms of syncope as well as from seizures and epilepsy, and what can be done to predict and prevent sudden death in these patients. This is achieved through the assessment triad of a clinical history and examination, risk stratification, and 12-lead electrocardiography (ECG).
    Epilepsia 12/2012; 53 Suppl 7:34-41. DOI:10.1111/j.1528-1167.2012.03713.x · 4.58 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Syncope recurrence in pacemaker-implanted subjects for the cardio-inhibitory response to sinus carotid massage (SCM) was investigated. The study-hypothesis was that recurrences had significant vasodepressor responses that could justify the loss of consciousness. Forty-six patients were enrolled (16 patients and 30 controls), followed and revaluated after 5-7 years. At the end of follow-up, significant differences were found between patients and controls in mean SCM SAP (87 versus 106 mmHg) and reduction in mean SCM SAP (59 versus 38 mmHg); in the number of symptomatic subjects soon after SCM (5 versus 1); and in the number of subjects suffering from orthostatic hypotension. A subgroup of 13 patients showed significantly different hypotensive responses to SCM compared with the values observed at study recruitment. The data showed that some subjects with a defined hemodynamic pattern in response to SCM may change their characteristics and have spontaneous and/or provocative symptoms. These data explain the syncopal relapses, and suggest the presence of autonomic dysregulation in individuals with carotid sinus hypersensitivity.
    09/2012; 2012:216206. DOI:10.5402/2012/216206