Article

Utility of waist-to-height ratio in detecting central obesity and related adverse cardiovascular risk profile among normal weight younger adults (from the Bogalusa Heart Study).

Tulane Center for Cardiovascular Health, Tulane University Health Sciences Center, New Orleans, Louisiana, USA.
The American journal of cardiology (Impact Factor: 3.58). 09/2009; 104(5):721-4. DOI: 10.1016/j.amjcard.2009.04.037
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Data on the utility of the waist-to-height ratio in detecting central obesity and related cardiovascular risk among normal weight younger adults are scant. This aspect was examined in 639 normal weight (body mass index 18.5 to 24.9 kg/m(2)) black and white adults (75% white and 36% men) 20 to 44 years old. The subjects with a waist-to-height ratio > or =0.5 were grouped as having central obesity normal weight, with the rest considered the control group. The subjects with central obesity, compared to the controls, after adjusting for age, race, and gender, had significantly greater diastolic blood pressure, mean arterial pressure, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol level, triglycerides, triglycerides/high-density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio, insulin, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance, uric acid, C-reactive protein, and liver function enzymes (alanine aminotransferase and gamma-glutamyl transferase). On multivariate analysis, the central obesity group compared to the control group was 1.9, 2.2, 2.9, and 2.5 times more likely to have significantly adverse levels (top tertile vs the rest) of mean arterial pressure, triglycerides/high-density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance, and C-reactive protein, respectively. The central obesity group also had a greater prevalence of dyslipidemia, hypertension, insulin resistance, hyperuricemia, and elevated C-reactive protein. The age-, race-, and gender-adjusted mean value of the common carotid intima-media thickness, a measure of subclinical atherosclerosis, was greater in the central obesity group compared to the control group (0.76 vs 0.71 mm, p = 0.009). In conclusion, these findings underscore the utility of the waist-to-height ratio in detecting central obesity and related adverse cardiovascular risk among normal weight younger adults.

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