Article

Attitudes toward psychiatry among Irish final year medical students.

Department of Psychiatry, University College Dublin, and St Vincent 's Hospital, Elm Park, Dublin 4, Ireland.
European Psychiatry (Impact Factor: 3.21). 02/1996; 11(8):407-11. DOI: 10.1016/S0924-9338(97)82579-5
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT This study investigated the attitudes of medical students towards psychiatry, both as a subject on the medical curriculum and as a career choice. Three separate questionnaires previously validated on medical student populations were administered prior to and immediately following an 8-week clinical training programme. The results indicate that the perception of psychiatry was positive prior to clerkship and became even more so on completion of training. On completion of the clerkship, there was a rise in the proportion of students who indicated that they might choose a career in psychiatry. Attitudes toward psychiatry correlated positively with the psychiatry examination results. Those that intended to specialise in psychiatry achieved significantly higher examination scores in the psychiatry examination.

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