Article

Birth outcomes, postpartum health and primary care contacts of immigrant mothers in an Australian nulliparous pregnancy cohort study.

Healthy Mothers Healthy Families Research Group, Murdoch Childrens Research Institute, Melbourne, VIC, Australia.
Maternal and Child Health Journal (Impact Factor: 2.24). 08/2009; 14(5):807-16. DOI: 10.1007/s10995-009-0514-x
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT To investigate differences and similarities in birth outcomes, postpartum health and primary care contacts of mothers born overseas of non-English speaking background (NESB) compared with Australian-born mothers. Nulliparous women were recruited in early pregnancy (< or =24 weeks gestation) to a prospective pregnancy cohort study from six metropolitan public hospitals in Victoria, Australia. Analyses are based on questionnaires completed in pregnancy and at 3 months postpartum. Of the 1,507 women recruited in the study, 1,431 women (95%) were followed up at 3 months postpartum. Immigrant mothers of NESB (n = 212) and Australian born mothers (n = 1,074) had similar obstetric outcomes and postpartum physical health outcomes. Immigrant women were more likely to say they had been depressed for 2 weeks or longer since the birth (Adj OR = 1.92, 95% CI 1.3-2.8); to report relationship problems (Adj OR = 1.39, 95% CI 0.9-2.1) and to report lower emotional satisfaction with their relationship with the partner (Adj OR = 1.69, 95% CI 1.1-2.6) after adjusting for age, education status, income, method of birth and genital tract trauma. Immigrant mothers were less likely to be asked about feeling low or depressed by general practitioners (OR = 0.79, 95% CI 0.5-0.9) and about relationship problems by maternal and child health nurses (OR = 0.68, 95% CI 0.5-0.9). Immigrant women of NESB reported greater psychological distress, less emotional satisfaction with their partner and more relationship problems in the first 3 months postpartum than Australian born women. Although immigrant mothers had an equivalent level of contact with primary care practitioners in the first 3 months postpartum, they were less likely to be asked about their emotional well-being or about relationship problems by health professionals.

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