Diet and deprivation in pregnancy

Nutrition and Epigenetics Group, Rowett Institute of Nutrition and Health, University of Aberdeen, Greenburn Road, Bucksburn, Aberdeen AB21 9SB, UK.
The British journal of nutrition (Impact Factor: 3.45). 09/2009; 102(10):1487-97. DOI: 10.1017/S0007114509990444
Source: PubMed


Deprivation is associated with poor pregnancy outcome but the role of nutrition as a mediating factor is not well understood. We carried out a prospective cohort study of 1461 singleton pregnancies in Aberdeen, UK during 2000-6. We measured nutrient intake and supplement use, B vitamin and homocysteine status, birth weight, gestational age, neonatal treatment and socio-economic deprivation status. Women in the most deprived deciles were approximately 6 years younger and half as likely to take folic acid supplements periconceptually as the least deprived mothers. Deprivation was associated with low blood folate, high homocysteine and diets low in protein, fibre and many of the vitamins and minerals. The diets of the more deprived women were also characterised by low intakes of fruit, vegetables and oily fish and higher intakes of processed meat, fried potatoes, crisps and snacks. Deprivation was related to preterm birth (OR 1.14 (95 % CI 1.03, 1.25); P = 0.009) and whether the baby required neonatal treatment (OR 1.07 (95 % CI 1.01, 1.14); P = 0.028). Low birth weight was more common in women consuming diets low in vitamin C (OR 0.79 (95 % CI 0.64, 0.97); P = 0.028), riboflavin (OR 0.77 (95 % CI 0.63, 0.93); P = 0.008), pantothenic acid (OR 0.79 (95 % CI 0.65, 0.97); P = 0.023) and sugars (OR 0.78 (95 % CI 0.64, 0.96); P = 0.017) even after adjustment for deprivation index, smoking, marital status and parity. Deprivation in pregnancy is associated with diets poor in specific nutrients and poor diet appears to contribute to inequalities in pregnancy outcome. Improving the nutrient intake of disadvantaged women of childbearing age may potentially improve pregnancy outcome.

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Available from: Chandrika J Piyathilake, Oct 02, 2014
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    • "A relevant finding was the higher risk of prematurity observed in women who followed the low GI dietary recommendations. This observation has not been reported previously, but there is evidence showing that dietary restriction during pregnancy is associated with higher risk of prematurity (OR: 1.14, 95% CI: 1.03 a 1.25, P = 0.009) [39]. The restriction of moderate and high GI foods in Group 2 may have resulted in a more restricted diet that could be associated with prematurity as well as with the observed lower frequency of excessive weight gain and the trend of lower birthweight in women in this group. "
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