Article

Insights into Anaphase Promoting Complex TPR subdomain assembly from a CDC26–APC6 structure

Departments of Structural Biology and Genetics/Tumor Cell Biology, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee, USA.
Nature Structural & Molecular Biology (Impact Factor: 11.63). 09/2009; 16(9):987-9. DOI: 10.1038/nsmb.1645
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT The multisubunit anaphase promoting complex (APC) is an essential cell-cycle regulator. Although CDC26 is known to have a role in APC assembly, its molecular function has remained unclear. Biophysical, structural and genetic studies presented here reveal that CDC26 stabilizes the structure of APC6, a core TPR protein required for APC integrity. Notably, CDC26-APC6 association involves an intermolecular TPR mimic composed of one helix from each protein.

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