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Potential association of DRD2 and DAT1 genetic variation with heroin dependence.

Key Laboratory of the National Ministry of Health for Forensic Sciences, College of Medicine, Xi'an Jiaotong University, 76 Yanta West Road, Xi'an 710061, PR China.
Neuroscience Letters (Impact Factor: 2.06). 09/2009; 464(2):127-30. DOI: 10.1016/j.neulet.2009.08.004
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT The aim of our study was to investigate the potential association of dopamine receptor D2 gene (DRD2) TaqI RFLP A (rs1800497) and dopamine transporter gene (DAT) 3'untranslated region VNTR genetic variations with heroin addiction. Genotyping was performed using PCR-based techniques in 530 heroin abusers and 500 controls. Our results showed that DRD2 TaqI A1 allele carriers (genotypes A1A1 and A1A2) were prone to heroin abuse in models of dominance or co-dominance. We detected a 12 repeat allele and 6/6, 7/9, 9/11, 10/12 genotype in a Chinese/eastern Asian population for the first time. However, no significant differences in the DAT1 VNTR were found between the two groups in either genotypic or allelic distributions and there was no gene interaction between the two genetic loci.

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