Article

Correlation of synovial fluid leptin concentrations with the severity of osteoarthritis

Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Good Samsun Hospital, 193-5, Jurye-dong, Sasang-gu, Busan, South Korea.
Clinical Rheumatology (Impact Factor: 1.77). 08/2009; 28(12):1431-5. DOI: 10.1007/s10067-009-1242-8
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Leptin is known to play an important role in the pathophysiology of osteoarthritis (OA). This study investigated whether synovial fluid (SF) leptin level is related to the radiographic severity of OA and its role as a quantitative marker for the detection of OA. SF was obtained from 42 OA patients who underwent knee surgery and 10 who had no abnormality of articular cartilage during arthroscopic examination. The progression of OA was classified by Kellgren-Lawrence grading scale. The concentrations of leptin were measured with commercial enzyme-linked-immunosorbent serologic assay kits. Median leptin concentrations in SF were significantly higher in OA patients (median 4.40 ng/ml; range 0.5-15.8) compared to controls (median 2.05 ng/ml; range 1.0-4.6; P = 0.006). SF leptin levels showed significant difference according to the severity of OA (P = 0.0125). Median SF leptin level was highest in stage IV patients (11.1 ng/ml), which was significantly higher compared to all other groups including controls (P < 0.05). Age showed a significant positive correlation with leptin concentrations in OA patients (P < 0.05), but not in controls. These results demonstrate that SF leptin concentrations were closely related to the radiographic severity of OA, suggesting that SF leptin levels could be used as an effective marker for quantitative detection of OA.

2 Followers
 · 
135 Views
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Turmeric has been long recognized for its anti-inflammatory and health-promoting properties. Curcumin is one of the principal anti-inflammatory and healthful components of turmeric comprising 2-8% of most turmeric preparations. Experimental evidence supports the activity of curcumin in promoting weight loss and reducing the incidence of obesity-related diseases. With the discovery that obesity is characterized by chronic low-grade metabolic inflammation, phytochemicals like curcumin which have anti-inflammatory activity are being intensely investigated. Recent scientific research reveals that curcumin directly interacts with white adipose tissue to suppress chronic inflammation. In adipose tissue, curcumin inhibits macrophage infiltration and nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) activation induced by inflammatory agents. Curcumin reduces the expression of the potent proinflammatory adipokines tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα), monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), and plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 (PAI-1), and it induces the expression of adiponectin, the principal anti-inflammatory agent secreted by adipocytes. Curcumin also has effects to inhibit adipocyte differentiation and to promote antioxidant activities. Through these diverse mechanisms curcumin reduces obesity and curtails the adverse health effects of obesity. © 2013 BioFactors, 2013.
    BioFactors 01/2013; 39(1). DOI:10.1002/biof.1074 · 3.00 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) has been implicated in development of osteoarthritis (OA). To determine the correlation between plasma and synovial fluid CTGF levels and the severity in knee osteoarthritis patients. A total of 100 subjects were recruited into this study (75 OA patients and 25 controls). CTGF concentrations in plasma and synovial fluid were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Plasma and synovial fluid CTGF concentrations were correlated with radiographic severity. There was a positive correlation between plasma and synovial fluid CTGF levels. CTGF could be useful for monitoring the severity and progression of OA.
    Biomarkers 03/2012; 17(4):303-8. DOI:10.3109/1354750X.2012.666676 · 2.52 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Obesity has been considered a risk factor for osteoarthritis and it is usually accepted that obesity contributes to the development and progression of osteoarthritis by increasing mechanical load of the joints. Nevertheless, recent advances in the physiology of white adipose tissue evidenced that fat cells produce a plethora of factors, called adipokines, which have a critical role in the development of ostearthritis, besides to mechanical effects. In this paper, we review the role of adipokines and highlight the cellular and molecular mechanisms at play in osteoarthritis elicited by adipokines. We also emphasize how defining the role of adipokines has broadned our understanding of the diversity of factors involved in the genesis and progression of osteoarthritis in the hope of modifying it to prevent and treat diseases.
    08/2011; 2011:203901. DOI:10.1155/2011/203901