Article

Mannose-6-phosphate/insulin-like growth factor 2 receptor (M6P/IGF2R) in carcinogenesis.

Division of Molecular Medicine, Rudjer Bosković Institute, Zagreb, Croatia.
Cancer letters (Impact Factor: 5.02). 08/2009; 289(1):11-22. DOI: 10.1016/j.canlet.2009.06.036
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT The cation-independent mannose-6-phosphate/insulin-like growth factor 2 receptor (M6P/IGF2R) is a multifunctional receptor. It is involved in a variety of cellular processes which become dysregulated in cancer. Its tumor suppressor role was recognized a long time ago. However, due to its multifunctionality, it is not easy to understand the extent of its relevance to normal cellular physiology. Accordingly, it is even more difficult understanding its role in carcinogenesis. This review presents critical and focused highlights of data relating to M6P/IGF2R, obtained during more than 25 years of cancer research.

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