Characterization of Bacteria, Clostridia and Bacteroides in Faeces of Vegetarians Using qPCR and PCR-DGGE Fingerprinting

Department of Nutritional Sciences, University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria.
Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism (Impact Factor: 2.62). 07/2009; 54(4):253-7. DOI: 10.1159/000229505
Source: PubMed


This study aimed to investigate the quantitative and qualitative changes of bacteria, Bacteroides, Bifidobacterium and Clostridium cluster IV in faecal microbiota associated with a vegetarian diet.
Bacterial abundances were measured in faecal samples of 15 vegetarians and 14 omnivores using quantitative PCR. Diversity was assessed with PCR-DGGE fingerprinting, principal component analysis (PCA) and Shannon diversity index.
Vegetarians had a 12% higher abundance of bacterial DNA than omnivores, a tendency for less Clostridium cluster IV (31.86 +/- 17.00%; 36.64 +/- 14.22%) and higher abundance of Bacteroides (23.93 +/- 10.35%; 21.26 +/- 8.05%), which were not significant due to high interindividual variations. PCA suggested a grouping of bacteria and members of Clostridium cluster IV. Two bands appeared significantly more frequently in omnivores than in vegetarians (p < 0.005 and p < 0.022). One was identified as Faecalibacterium sp. and the other was 97.9% similar to the uncultured gut bacteriumDQ793301.
A vegetarian diet affects the intestinal microbiota, especially by decreasing the amount and changing the diversity of Clostridium cluster IV. It remains to be determined how these shifts might affect the host metabolism and disease risks.

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Available from: Jutta Zwielehner, Oct 02, 2015
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    • "than controls (Zimmer et al., 2011). A vegetarian diet has also been shown to decrease the amount and change the diversity of Clostridium cluster IV and Clostridium clusters XIV and XVII (Liszt et al., 2009). However, large well-controlled trials are needed to elucidate the mechanisms that link dietary changes to alterations in microbial composition as well as the implications of key population changes for health and disease. "
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    • "However, the amounts of Clostridium clusters IV and XIVa (Hippe et al. 2011), or the specifically addressed butyrate producers Roseburia spp./Eubacterium rectale (Kabeerdoss et al. 2011) and Faecalibacterium spp. (Liszt et al. 2009), have been found to be significantly lower in vegetarians than in omnivores. "
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