Article

The pharmacology of sigma-1 receptors

Team II Endogenous Neuroprotection in Neurodegenerative Diseases, INSERM U. 710, 34095 Montpellier Cedex 5, France.
Pharmacology [?] Therapeutics (Impact Factor: 7.75). 08/2009; 124(2):195-206. DOI: 10.1016/j.pharmthera.2009.07.001
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Originally considered an enigmatic protein, the sigma-1 receptor has recently been identified as a unique ligand-regulated molecular chaperone in the endoplasmic reticulum of cells. This discovery causes us to look back at the many proposed roles of this receptor, even before its molecular function was identified, in many diseases such as methamphetamine or cocaine addiction, amnesia, pain, depression, Alzheimer's disease, stroke, retinal neuroprotection, HIV infection, and cancer. In this review, we examine the reports that have clearly shown an agonist-antagonist relationship regarding sigma-1 receptors in models of those diseases and also review the relatively known mechanisms of action of sigma-1 receptors in an attempt to spur the speculation of readers on how the sigma-1 receptor at the endoplasmic reticulum might relate to so many diseases. We found that the most prominent action of sigma-1 receptors in biological systems including cell lines, primary cultures, and animals is the regulation and modulation of voltage-regulated and ligand-gated ion channels, including Ca(2+)-, K(+)-, Na(+), Cl(-), and SK channels, and NMDA and IP3 receptors. We found that the final output of the action of sigma-1 receptor agonists is to inhibit all above-mentioned voltage-gated ion channels, while they potentiate ligand-gated channels. The inhibition or potentiation induced by agonists is blocked by sigma-1 receptor antagonists. Other mechanisms of action of sigma-1 receptors, and to some extent those of sigma-2 receptors, were also considered. We conclude that the sigma-1 and sigma-2 receptors represent potential fruitful targets for therapeutic developments in combating many human diseases.

3 Followers
 · 
146 Views
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The sigma-1 receptor (S1R) is a ligand-regulated membrane chaperone protein associated with endoplasmic reticulum stress response, and modulation of ion channel activities at the plasma membrane. We report here a solution NMR study of a S1R construct (S1R(Δ35)) in which only the first transmembrane domain and the eight-residue N-terminus have been removed. The second transmembrane helix is found to be composed of residues 91-107, which corresponds to the first steroid binding domain-like region. The cytosolic domain is found to contain three helices, and the secondary structure and backbone dynamics of the chaperone domain are consistent with that determined previously for the chaperone domain alone. The position of TM2 provides a framework for ongoing studies of S1R ligand binding and oligomerisation.
    FEBS Letters 01/2015; 589(5). DOI:10.1016/j.febslet.2015.01.033 · 3.34 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Berend Olivier has had a long-standing interest in the utility of animal models for a wide variety of therapeutic indications. His work has spanned multiple types of models, blending ethological, or species typical and naturalistic behaviors, along with methodologies based on learned behavior. He has consistently done so, from an analytical as well as predictive perspective, and has made multiple contributions while working in both the pharmaceutical industry and within an academic institution. Although focused primarily on psychiatric disorders, Berend has conducted research in the area of pain in humans and in animals, demonstrating an expansive appreciation for the breadth, scope and significance of the science and applications of the discipline of pharmacology to these diverse areas. This review focuses on the use of animal models in pain research from the perspective of the long-standing deficiencies in the development of therapeutics in this area and from a preclinical perspective where the translational weaknesses have been quite problematic. The challenges confronting animal models of pain, however, are not unique to this area of research, as they cut across several therapeutic areas. Despite the deficiencies, failures and concerns, existing animal models of pain continue to be of widespread use and are essential to progress in pain research as well as in other areas. Although not focusing on specific animal models of pain, this article seeks to examine general issues facing the use of these models. It does so by exploring alternative approaches which capture recent developments, which build upon principles and concepts we have learned from Berend's contributions, and which provide the prospect of helping to address the absence of novel therapeutics in this area. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.
    European Journal of Pharmacology 01/2015; 753. DOI:10.1016/j.ejphar.2014.11.046 · 2.68 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Background According to reports in the literature, more than 30% of depressive patients fail to achieve remission. Therapy with the conventional antidepressant drugs may induce the serious adverse reactions. Moreover, its benefits may be seen at least 2–4 weeks after the first dose. Therefore, the alternative strategies for prevention and treatment of depression are sought. The main aim of our study was to assess the effects of ifenprodil given at a non-active dose (10 mg/kg) on the activity of antidepressant agents from diverse pharmacological groups. Methods The antidepressant-like effect was assessed by the forced swim test in mice. Results Ifenprodil potentiated the antidepressant-like effect of imipramine (15 mg/kg) and fluoxetine (5 mg/kg) while did not reduce the immobility time of animals which simultaneously received reboxetine (2.5 mg/kg) or tianeptine (15 mg/kg). Conclusion The concomitant administration of certain commonly prescribed antidepressant drugs that affect the serotonergic neurotransmission (i.e., typical tricyclic antidepressants and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors) with a negative modulator selectively binding to the GluN1/N2B subunits of the NMDA receptor complex (i.e., ifenprodil) may induce a more pronounced antidepressant-like effect than monotherapy. However, these findings still need to be confirmed in further experiments.
    Pharmacological reports: PR 12/2014; 66(6):1031–1036. DOI:10.1016/j.pharep.2014.06.016 · 2.17 Impact Factor

Preview

Download
6 Downloads
Available from