Article

Treatment for avascular necrosis of bone in people with sickle cell disease.

Iberoamerican Cochrane Network, Valencia, Edo. Carabobo, Venezuela, 2001.
Cochrane database of systematic reviews (Online) (Impact Factor: 5.94). 02/2009; DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD004344.pub3
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Avascular necrosis of bone is a frequent and severe complication of sickle cell disease (SCD) and its treatment is not standardised.
To determine the impact of any surgical procedure compared with other surgical interventions or non-surgical procedures, on avascular necrosis of bone in people with SCD in terms of efficacy and safety.
We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Haemoglobinopathies Trials Register, comprising references identified from comprehensive electronic database searches and handsearches of relevant journals and abstract books of conference proceedings. Additional trials were sought from the reference lists of papers identified by the search strategy.Most recent search: 27 March 2009.
Randomised clinical trials comparing specific therapies for avascular necrosis of bone in people with SCD.
Each author independently extracted data and assessed trial quality. Since only one trial was identified, meta-analysis was not possible.
One trial (46 participants) was eligible for inclusion. After randomisation eight participants were withdrawn, mainly because they declined to participate in the trial. Data were analysed for 38 participants at the end of the trial. After a mean follow up of three years, hip core decompression and physical therapy did not show clinical improvement when compared with physical therapy alone using the score from the original trial (an improvement of 18.1 points for those treated with intervention therapy versus an improvement of 15.7 points with control therapy). There was no significant statistical difference between groups regarding major complications (hip pain, relative risk (RR) 0.95 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.56 to 1.60; vaso-occlusive crises, RR 1.14 (95% CI 0.72 to 1.80); and acute chest syndrome, RR 1.06 (95% CI 0.44 to 2.56)). This trial did not report results on mortality or quality of life.
We found no evidence that adding hip core decompression to physical therapy achieves clinical improvement in people with SCD with avascular necrosis of bone compared to physical therapy alone. However, we highlight that our conclusion is based on one trial with high attrition rates. Further randomised controlled trials are necessary to evaluate the role of hip-core depression for this clinical condition. Endpoints should focus on participants' subjective experience (e.g. quality of life and pain) as well as more objective 'time-to-event' measures (e.g. mortality, survival, hip longevity). The availability of participants to allow adequate trial power will be a key consideration for endpoint choice.

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