Article

CVD-diamond external cavity Raman laser at 573 nm

MQ Photonics Research Centre, Macquarie University, NSW, Australia.
Optics Express (Impact Factor: 3.53). 12/2008; 16(23):18950-5. DOI: 10.1364/OE.16.018950
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Recent progress in diamond growth via chemical vapor deposition (CVD) has enabled the manufacture of single crystal samples of sufficient size and quality for realizing Raman laser devices. Here we report an external cavity CVD-diamond Raman laser pumped by a Q-switched 532 nm laser. In the investigated configuration, the dominant output coupling was by reflection loss at the diamond's uncoated Brewster angle facets caused by the crystal's inherent birefringence. Output pulses of wavelength 573 nm with a combined energy of 0.3 mJ were obtained with a slope efficiency of conversion of up to 22%.

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