Article

Deficiency of Dol-P-Man Synthase Subunit DPM3 Bridges the Congenital Disorders of Glycosylation with the Dystroglycanopathies

Laboratory of Pediatrics & Neurology, Institute for Genetic and Metabolic Disease, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, 6500 HB Nijmegen, The Netherlands.
The American Journal of Human Genetics (Impact Factor: 10.99). 08/2009; 85(1):76-86. DOI: 10.1016/j.ajhg.2009.06.006
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Alpha-dystroglycanopathies such as Walker Warburg syndrome represent an important subgroup of the muscular dystrophies that have been related to defective O-mannosylation of alpha-dystroglycan. In many patients, the underlying genetic etiology remains unsolved. Isolated muscular dystrophy has not been described in the congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDG) caused by N-linked protein glycosylation defects. Here, we present a genetic N-glycosylation disorder with muscular dystrophy in the group of CDG type I. Extensive biochemical investigations revealed a strongly reduced dolichol-phosphate-mannose (Dol-P-Man) synthase activity. Sequencing of the three DPM subunits and complementation of DPM3-deficient CHO2.38 cells showed a pathogenic p.L85S missense mutation in the strongly conserved coiled-coil domain of DPM3 that tethers catalytic DPM1 to the ER membrane. Cotransfection experiments in CHO cells showed a reduced binding capacity of DPM3(L85S) for DPM1. Investigation of the four Dol-P-Man-dependent glycosylation pathways in the ER revealed strongly reduced O-mannosylation of alpha-dystroglycan in a muscle biopsy, thereby explaining the clinical phenotype of muscular dystrophy. This mild Dol-P-Man biosynthesis defect due to DPM3 mutations is a cause for alpha-dystroglycanopathy, thereby bridging the congenital disorders of glycosylation with the dystroglycanopathies.

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