Rapid antidepressant effects of sleep deprivation therapy correlates with serum BDNF changes in major depression

Trakya University School of Medicine, Psychiatry Department, 22030 Edirne, Turkey.
Brain research bulletin (Impact Factor: 2.72). 08/2009; 80(3):158-62. DOI: 10.1016/j.brainresbull.2009.06.016
Source: PubMed


Recent reports have suggested that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels are reduced in individuals suffering major depressive disorder and these levels normalize following antidepressant treatment. Various antidepressants and electroconvulsive therapy are shown to have a positive effect on brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels in depressive patients. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of total sleep deprivation therapy on BDNF levels in major depressive patients. Patients were assigned to two treatment groups which consisted of 22 patients in the sertraline group and 19 patients in the total sleep deprivation plus sertraline group. Patients in the sleep deprivation group were treated with three total sleep deprivations in the first week of their treatment and received sertraline. Patients in sertraline group received only sertraline. BDNF levels were measured in the two treatment groups at baseline, 7th, 14th, and 42nd days. Patients were also evaluated using the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D). A control group, consisting of 33 healthy volunteers had total sleep deprivation, BDNF levels and depression measured at baseline and after the total sleep deprivation. Results showed that serum BDNF levels were significantly lower at baseline in both treatment groups compared to controls. Decreased levels of BDNF were also negatively correlated with HAM-D scores. First single sleep deprivation and a series of three sleep deprivations accelerated the treatment response that significantly decreased HAM-D scores and increased BDNF levels. Total sleep deprivation and sertraline therapy is introduced to correlate with the rapid treatment response and BDNF changes in this study.

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Available from: Yasemin Gorgulu, Feb 17, 2015
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    • "In contrast, physical exercise increases brain BDNF expression [10] and plasma BDNF concentration in young healthy men [11] and patients with amnestic mild cognitive impairment [12]. In addition, sleep deprivation, which is sometimes used in depression therapy, has been reported to increase serum BDNF concentration [13]. However, a pilot study with a small sample size did not reveal any alterations in plasma BDNF concentrations in severely depressed patients after sleep deprivation, despite a significant amelioration of depressive symptoms [14]. "
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    ABSTRACT: Decreased concentrations of plasma brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and serum BDNF have been proposed to be a state marker of depression and a biological indicator of loaded psychosocial stress. Stress evaluations of participants in military mission are critically important and appropriate objective biological parameters that evaluate stress are needed. In military circumstances, there are several problems to adopt plasma BDNF concentration as a stress biomarker. First, in addition to psychosocial stress, military missions inevitably involve physical exercise that increases plasma BDNF concentrations. Second, most participants in the mission do not have adequate quality or quantity of sleep, and sleep deprivation has also been reported to increase plasma BDNF concentration. We evaluated plasma BDNF concentrations in 52 participants on a 9-week military mission. The present study revealed that plasma BDNF concentration significantly decreased despite elevated serum enzymes that escaped from muscle and decreased quantity and quality of sleep, as detected by a wearable watch-type sensor. In addition, we observed a significant decrease in plasma vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) during the mission. VEGF is also neurotrophic and its expression in the brain has been reported to be up-regulated by antidepressive treatments and down-regulated by stress. This is the first report of decreased plasma VEGF concentrations by stress. We conclude that decreased plasma concentrations of neurotrophins can be candidates for mental stress indicators in actual stressful environments that include physical exercise and limited sleep.
    PLoS ONE 02/2014; 9(2):e89455. DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0089455 · 3.23 Impact Factor
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    • "Various authors have reported low BDNF serum concentrations in depressive patients and in association with suicidal behavior [42-44]. BDNF administration to the DRN cells has been observed to have an antidepressant effect [45]. "
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    ABSTRACT: Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a multifactorial disorder known to be influenced by both genetic and environmental factors. MDD presents a heritability of 37%, and a genetic contribution has also been observed in studies of family members of individuals with MDD that imply that the probability of suffering the disorder is approximately three times higher if a first-degree family member is affected. Childhood maltreatment and stressful life events (SLEs) have been established as critical environmental factors that profoundly influence the onset of MDD. The serotonin pathway has been a strong candidate for genetic studies, but it only explains a small proportion of the heritability of the disorder, which implies the involvement of other pathways. The serotonin (5-HT) pathway interacts with the stress response pathway in a manner mediated by the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. To analyze the interaction between the pathways, we propose the use of a synchronous Boolean network (SBN) approximation. The principal aim of this work was to model the interaction between these pathways, taking into consideration the presence of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), in order to observe how the pathways interact and to examine if the system is stable. Additionally, we wanted to study which genes or metabolites have the greatest impact on model stability when knocked out in silico. We observed that the biological model generated predicts steady states (attractors) for each of the different runs performed, thereby proving that the system is stable. These attractors changed in shape, especially when anti-depressive drugs were also included in the simulation. This work also predicted that the genes with the greatest impact on model stability were those involved in the neurotrophin pathway, such as CREB, BDNF (which has been associated with major depressive disorder in a variety of studies) and TRkB, followed by genes and metabolites related to 5-HT synthesis.
    Theoretical Biology and Medical Modelling 10/2013; 10(1):59. DOI:10.1186/1742-4682-10-59 · 0.95 Impact Factor
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    • "In addition, BDNF levels were higher in patients who responded to antidepressant drugs than those who did not (Karege et al. 2002a ; Sen et al. 2008) and were also higher in those patients responding to sleep deprivation (Gorgulu & Caliyurt, 2009). Another recent study noted a causal association between ketamine's antidepressant-like effects and increased activity-dependent BDNF in rodents (Autry et al. 2011). "
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    ABSTRACT: The N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist ketamine has rapid antidepressant effects in treatment-resistant major depressive disorder (MDD). In rats, ketamine selectively increased electroencephalogram (EEG) slow wave activity (SWA) during non-rapid eye movement (REM) sleep and altered central brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression. Taken together, these findings suggest that higher SWA and BDNF levels may respectively represent electrophysiological and molecular correlates of mood improvement following ketamine treatment. This study investigated the acute effects of a single ketamine infusion on depressive symptoms, EEG SWA, individual slow wave parameters (surrogate markers of central synaptic plasticity) and plasma BDNF (a peripheral marker of plasticity) in 30 patients with treatment-resistant MDD. Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale scores rapidly decreased following ketamine. Compared to baseline, BDNF levels and early sleep SWA (during the first non-REM episode) increased after ketamine. The occurrence of high amplitude waves increased during early sleep, accompanied by an increase in slow wave slope, consistent with increased synaptic strength. Changes in BDNF levels were proportional to changes in EEG parameters. Intriguingly, this link was present only in patients who responded to ketamine treatment, suggesting that enhanced synaptic plasticity - as reflected by increased SWA, individual slow wave parameters and plasma BDNF - is part of the physiological mechanism underlying the rapid antidepressant effects of NMDA antagonists. Further studies are required to confirm the link found here between behavioural and synaptic changes, as well as to test the reliability of these central and peripheral biomarkers of rapid antidepressant response.
    The International Journal of Neuropsychopharmacology 06/2012; 16(2):1-11. DOI:10.1017/S1461145712000545 · 4.01 Impact Factor
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