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Available from: Laura Acuna, Apr 30, 2014
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of the study was to determine whether stressful events reported on the Social Readjustment Scale (SRRS) predicted reports of different symptoms on the Scale of Physical and Psychological Symptoms (SPPS). A second purpose was to determine whether parents and their children agree in their reports. Mexican children (N=287) from elementary schools and some of their parents (N = 156) answered the questionnaires. Results showed that scores on the SRRS correlated with scores on the SPPS and that there was a low degree of agreement between the reports of parents and children. The degree of consistency on stressful events and symptoms reported by the children�s and their parents varied with the children�s gender, school grade and type of school. El propósito del estudio fue conocer si los eventos vitales reportados en la Escala de Reajuste Social (SRRS) predecirían la frecuencia de síntomas reportados en la Escala de Síntomas Físicos y Psicológicos (ESFP). Un segundo propósito fue conocer el grado de acuerdo entre los reportes de padres e hijos. Niños mexicanos de educación elemental (N=287) y algunos de sus padres (N=156) respondieron ambos cuestionarios. Se encontró que los puntajes en el SRRS correlacionaron con los puntajes en la ESFP. Los resultados también mostraron un bajo grado de acuerdo entre informantes. La consistencia entre padres e hijos sobre el reporte de eventos vitales y síntomas de enfermedad varió en función del sexo, grado escolar y tipo de escuela de los niños.
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    ABSTRACT: It has been shown that with both animals and humans stress can damage health. It has also been shown that some psychological variables modulate the relation between stress and health. The present paper summarizes the results from various studies done in Mexico regarding the effect of several psychological variables on people's health. The paper presents results from studies in which the social readjustment rating for adults and for elementary school children were validated in Mexico. Data regarding the validation in Mexico of the social support questionnaire are also presented. The results from a study that used the reports of school peers about their willingness to interact with an individual showed that social support can be measured as an authentic independent variable. The paper also reviews the results from studies that showed that as predicted by social impact theory, the first perceived helpers are responsible for the beneficial effects of social support while the effect of each additional helper is only marginal. The paper summarizes the results from studies that showed that as in other countries stress predicted reliably the frequency with which children and adults experienced somatic symptoms and that perceived social support mitigated the noxious effects of stress. Different from other countries, in Mexico femininity and not masculinity mitigated the noxious effects of stress on health while coping strategies did not modulate the effects of stress.
    12/2012; 2(3):825-841.