Article

ANALYSES AND QUANTITATIVE METHODS FOR INFORMATION MANAGEMENT IN MEDIUM SIZE COMPANIES

Journal of Applied Quantitative Methods 01/2006;
Source: DOAJ

ABSTRACT The important questions that confront today the executive management are: Is thefinancial-accounting data accessible and manageable? How quickly do you get theinformation you need? Are your routine reports available soon enough? Would yourcompany’s performance improve if you have had them sooner? When you or others need theanswer to a pressing business question, do you get it soon enough? Is the information youreceive always reliable? How often do you find errors? Do they track allocated costsaccurately? In a planning or decision-making situation, how easily can you and others in yourcompany collaborate by sharing data and analyses? How often do two people in yourorganization have two different numbers for the same thing? Your answers to these questionswill help you assess how pressing your company’s information management issue is. If it istypical, you get some of the financial information you need on a timely basis and some of it alittle or a lot later than you would like. The purpose of this paper is to presents valuableoptions for quantitative methods and analyses that will make it possible to get accounting financialinformation about businesses with convenable speed.

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