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La Vegetación de los Páramos La Aguada, La Fría y Espejo en los Andes Venezolanos

Plantula 01/2001;
Source: DOAJ

ABSTRACT The vegetation of the páramos La Aguada, La Fría and Espejo in the «Sierra Nevada de Mérida» National Park (Venezuela) is analyzed using phytosociological methods. Floristic composition, vegetation structure and some ecological aspects are treated. Anthropogenic factors are discussed for selected communities. The spatial distribution of the communities in an area of about 1.400 ha, ranging from 3.000 to 4.980 m a.s.l., is shown in a vegetation map at a 1:15.000 scale. Forests of Podocarpus oleifolius reach up to 3.100 m. The adjacent vegetation delt extending from 3.100 m to 3.400 m consists of different woodland communities with scattered trees. The community of Blechnum loxense and Vaccinium meridionale has structural similarities to upper subpáramo vegetation, but it is of anthropogenic origin. Natural upper subpáramo vegetation has not been found in the study area. From 3.400 to 3.900 m the vegetation is dominated by various grassland communities with Calamagrostis effusa, Espeletia schultzii, Espeletiopsis pannosa and Chaetolepis lindeniana. The community of Arcytophyllum nitidum and Lobelia tenera, as well as the community of Espeletia schultzii and Aciachne acicularis, found between 3.900 and 4.200 m, might well constitute an additional zone or subzone. Superpáramo or rather the “Piso Altiandino” extends from its lower limit at 4.000 - 4.400 m up to 4.800 m. Character species of different supe rpáramo communities are Coespeletia moritziana, C. spicata, C. timotensis, Festuca tolucensis and Poa pauciflora.

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